ArkivDigital launches two new powerful registers

ArkivDigital has recently launched two new powerful registers:

  • Population of Sweden 1880-1920
  • Population of Sweden 1960

If you wish to access these new registers, subscribe to our All-in-one subscription, which gives you access to all the historical documents in ArkivDigital along with these new registers. In order to access the registers, you will need to install our new software, ArkivDigital 2.0 beta. You can download the software from our website: http://www.arkivdigital.net/products/adonline/installation

Population of Sweden 1880-1920

The Population of Sweden 1880-1920 is a digital searchable name register of all of the Swedish household records and congregation books from around 1880 to 1920. In other words:  A fantastic tool for solving those genealogical mysteries in your family tree!

Whatever happened to your great-grandfather’s little brother?  His name appeared in an 1860’s household record, but then he vanished. Surely, he moved somewhere. But where?

This tool is the first one to employ as you pursue an answer.   You can search for a person by name, birth date, or other characteristics and you will see a result list of possible candidates. Click on a good possibility and you will pull up a transcription of that person’s complete information along with a link to the original record.

You may have the answer before you can say, “There’s Great Uncle Sven!”

The register is created in partnership with MyHeritage.

Sweden Population 1888Searching in Population of Sweden 1880-1920

 Population of Sweden 1960

The 1960 Swedish Census index is a wonderful source for those seeking information about people living in Sweden during the middle of the last century.  This census is drawn from the country’s tax register published in 1961 using data collected late in the previous year and includes everyone who then lived in Sweden.

The register is searchable by name and includes full name, birth date and birth parish, marital status, and information about their place of residence. Individuals are grouped by households, though the relationships among those living together are not stated. Nonetheless, it is often possible to infer additional information.  If a man and woman in the same household have the same marriage date, for example, they most likely are married to each other.

Additional information in the database includes the maiden name of married women and the place of registration in the previous tax register. Usually, there is a link to the first image of the parish birth book that will contain the person’s birth record.

1960 Swedish CensusPopulation of Sweden 1960

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Christmas 1814 – Birth Record Reading Example

All of us at ArkivDigital wish you much success in your genealogy research and best wishes for a wonderful holiday season!

In this blog, you will find a record reading example for a birth record on Christmas Day 200 years ago. It is for a female child, Märta, born on Christmas Day in Arvika landsförsamling in Värmland county in 1814.

Christmasimage

Arvika landsförsamling CI:7 (1809-1827) Image 49 / page 87 (AID: v4798.b49.s87, NAD: SE/VA/13011) Link

The format of this birth record is divided into five columns. The first column gives the birth date, December 25th and the second column the baptismal date, December 26th.

The text section gives the residence, names of the child’s parents and the names of the baptismal witnesses.

Transcription of Main Text
W. Sund: Par: Drängen Brynte Persson och pigan Anna Hindriksdotter, Testes – Per Bengtsson och Nils Andersson samt Hustrurna Karin Persdotter och Maria Andersdotter från V. Sund.

Translation of Main Text
Västra Sund: Parents: Farmhand Brynte Persson and maid Anna Hindriksdotter, Witnesses – Per Bengtsson and Nils Andersson along with wives Karin Persdotter and Maria Andersdotter from Västra Sund.

The next column states the age range for the mother and in this case the mother’s age is between 25 and 30 years.

The last column on the right gives the child’s name, Märta. The letters, “o:ä” are an abbreviation for oäkta or illegitimate child. Note, in this record the name of the father is given whereas in most cases during this time period the father’s name is not shown in the birth record for an illegitimate child.

Additional Tips
Notice that the residence, Västra Sund, is abbreviated as W. Sund for the child’s birth residence and V. Sund for the witnesses’ residence. The letters and V and W were often interchanged. Often a place name that begins with Västra (West) will be abbreviated with a W or V as shown in the above record. 

It is important to note the place name where the child’s family lived because you will need that to locate the family in the corresponding household examination book. In this case, you will find the mother and child at the following reference near the bottom of the page: Arvika landsförsamling AI:8 (1811-1816) Image 119 / page 113 (AID: v9544.b119.s113, NAD: SE/VA/13011).  Link

You will often find Latin words in Swedish church books especially in the earlier years. In this birth record, there are two Latin terms:

  1. Par. – an abbreviation for the Latin word, parentes or parents in English
  2. Testes – witnesses

See more birth record examples.

ArkivDigital

 

Death Record Reading

The contents of the death records in the Swedish church books vary by time and parish. Usually, the death record will contain the name of the deceased, death and burial date, place of residence, age and cause of death. However, in some parishes you will find a death record that gives a biographical sketch or an obituary of the deceased’s life. Because of the extra detail given in these records, these are treasures if you find one for your ancestor.

An example of a death record that reads like an obituary is found in the Söderfors parish for Anna Bäckström who died on November 27, 1799 and was buried on the 8th of December 1799.

soderforsdeath record

Söderfors F:1 (1788-1860) Image 30 (AID: v126071.b30, NAD: SE/ULA/11524)  Link

Record Transcription
Anna Bäckström.  Enka efter afl. Hammarsmeds Mästaren Matts Martin. Född härstädes år 1720.  Fadren:  Ankar Mäst. Pehr Olofsson Bäckström.  Modren: Hustru Catharina Bohm.   År  1744, ingick hon ägtenskap med sin före nämde man i hvilket hon hade 7 barn: 4 söner och 3 döttrar.  Af de förre äro redan 2ne äfven  som 2ne af de sednare med dö.
Den afgångne.  Ålderdomsbräckligheten slutade ett lif, som var ret utmärkt af Gudsfruktan ock christeligt tålamod.

Record Translation
Anna Bäckstrom. Widow of the deceased Master forging blacksmith, Matts Martin.  She was born in this place in 1720. Her father was Ankar Master Pehr Olofsson Bäckström and her mother was wife Catharina Bohm. In 1744, she married the previous named man (Matts Martin) who together had seven children: 4 sons and 3 daughters. Two of the four sons and two of the three daughters are deceased.
Cause of death: Old age infirmities ended a life which was distinguished by the fear of God and Christian patience.
Her age at death was 79 years, 5 months and 27 days.

On our website, you will find more death record examples with transcriptions and English translations.

ArkivDigital

 

Estate Inventory (Bouppteckning) Reading Example

Many persons with Swedish ancestry who don’t speak Swedish have commented that they feel comfortable researching in the Swedish church books but the estate inventories seem so much more intimidating because there is much more Swedish text.  Yes, it is true that they contain much Swedish text but they provide such a wealth of information, it is worth the time to learn how to better understand these records.

The Swedish estate inventories (bouppteckningar) provide genealogical information and help one gain a better understanding of one’s ancestor’s life. The estate inventory details the assets and debts of the deceased.

The estate inventory is divided in two primary divisions: the ingress or preamble and the inventory of the deceased’s assets and debts. In this blog we will look at the ingress or preamble. The ingress provides genealogical information such as the name of the deceased and names of the deceased’s heirs. Many times the ingress can be helpful in solving genealogical mysteries such as proving genealogical relationships or locating the whereabouts of an heir.

In most estate inventories, the format of the ingress is similar.  You will generally find the following information:

  1. Date the estate inventory was performed.
  2. Name of the deceased.
  3. Place of the deceased’s death.
  4. Date of deceased’s death.
  5. Names of heirs.
  6. Name of guardian for minors or persons who emigrated.

Below is an image the ingress or preamble of an estate inventory followed by a transcription and an English translation.Estate Inventory Karl Johan Ögren Aska, Dals och Bobergs domsaga FII:2 (1909-1909) Image 140 / page 3 (AID: v513944.b140.s3, NAD: SE/VALA/01625)
Link

Transcription
År 1908 den 19 December förrattades bouppteckning efter Husägaren Karl Johan Ögren från Säby ägor hvilken aflidit därstädes den 23 sistlidne September och såsom sterbhusdelagäre efterlämnat sonsöner: Gustaf Robert Ögren i Jamestown, N. Y. Nord America och Karl August Ögren äfven boende i Jamestown. Båda myndiga.

Deras rätt bevakades enligt fullmakt af Kyrkoherden David Johansson i Örberga.
Boet upgafts under edlig förpliktelse av sonhustrun Änka Klara Ögren samt antecknades och värderas i följande ordning.

Translation
On the 19th of December, 1908, an estate inventory was performed for homeowner, Karl Johan Ögren who lived at Säby ägor. He died there on September 23. The co-heirs of the estate were the grandsons: Gustaf Robert Ögren in Jamestown, New York, North American and Karl August Ögren also living in Jamestown. Both were of legal age.

Their rights (of inheritance) were protected by a power of attorney by Pastor David Johansson in Örberga.
Under oath, the estate inventory was conducted in accordance with the law by the daughter-in-law, Widow Klara Ögren.  The recording of the inventory and value of each item follows.

In this case, we learn that the heirs were living in Jamestown, New York, a place where many Swedes settled.

Click here for more information about estate inventories including a short Swedish-English glossary of commonly used words in the estate inventories.

ArkivDigital