Skånska Documents from the Danish Period

Skåne’s Genealogical Society (Skånes Genealogiska Förbund abbreviated SGF) was established in 1937. In the beginning most of the research was focused on the nobility, the church ministers and the bourgeois. A greater interest in genealogy developed in the 1950’s and 1960’s when the Swedish church books were microfilmed. In the 1970’s and 1980’s, one was able to borrow microfilms from other parts of the country. But in Skåne if one wanted to research before 1658, (the time before Skåne was part of Sweden), one had to travel to Copenhagen where some documents were available at the Danish National Archives (Rigsarkivet). During the 1980s, the board of SGF repeatedly held discussions about the possibility of establishing a society archive. The thought was to acquire copies of important and difficult to access Skånska archival documents. These thoughts became reality in 1980 when a monetary grant was received to make photocopies of documents concerning Skåne that were preserved in the Danish National Archives. In addition, a number of documents stored at the Swedish National Archives were also copied.

skane documents

Link to record.

Approximately 20,000 paper copies were copied and also some documents in Stockholm that were not available in Skåne formed the SGF archive. This archive was created before the age of digitization. A catalog was created in book form listing the archive contents so that copies of these documents could be ordered.

A few years ago, the Skåne Genealogical Society changed their Swedish name from Skånes Genealogiska Förbund to Skånes Släktforskarförbund (abbreviated SkSF) and changed the archive name to SkSF archive. At the Skåne Genealogical’s Society’s meeting in 2016 a motion was made to digitize these materials and ArkivDigital was asked if they would scan the paper copies and make them available.

land book denmark1604 Land register from Asmundtorp. AID:v880266.b270.s27

The material consists mostly of tax registers and land registers from the 1500’s and 1600’s but there are also other documents. In 1676, Denmark occupied parts of Skåne and quickly created tax registers for those parts of Sweden that they took back. There were even rolls listing the friskytta (fighters) who fought for the Danish king.

skane muster roll

Muster roll for Captain Eskils Nielsen’s company friskyttar, mustered in Helsingborg on July 10,1679. AID:v880383.b630.s63

To access the material (note these are scanned paper copies and not photographs of the original documents), search for Skånes Släktforskarförbund archive. Keep in mind that the county division was different during the Danish time. For example. there were both Helsingborg and Landskrona counties, as well as some smaller counties. A register of parishes and towns is in the process of being prepared to facilitate searching.

Read the original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Swedish Estate Inventory (Bouppteckning) Tutorials and Blogs

Estate Inventory Karl Johan ÖgrenAska, Dals och Bobergs domsaga FII:2 (1909-1909) Image 140 / page 3 (AID: v513944.b140.s3, NAD: SE/VALA/01625) (Link)

The Swedish Church Books are a gold mine for the Swedish genealogist providing a wealth of information and are usually the first source to use when researching one’s Swedish heritage. But there are many additional types of records that can help in researching one’s ancestor and gaining a better understanding of how one’s ancestor lived. One very wonderful resource is the bouppteckning or the estate inventory.

Today, we would like to provide a summary of our English tutorials and blogs providing tips on how to get started and researching in the estate inventories as well as the certificates of poverty in Stockholm.

  • Introduction to Swedish estate inventory research
    https://www.arkivdigital.net/swedish-genealogy/swedish-estate-inventories (Link)
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/estate-inventory-bouppteckning-reading-example (Link)
  • Tips for finding an estate inventory register in an estate inventory volume
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/tips-for-finding-an-estate-inventory-register-in-an-estate-inventory-volume (Link)
  • Solving a genealogical mystery using an estate inventory
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/where-did-klara-settle-in-north-america (Link)
  • Browsing in the estate inventories
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/the-daughters-dowries (Link)
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/burial-costs (Link)
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/estate-inventory-more-than-300-pages (Link)
  • Introduction to the certificates of poverty in Stockholm
    https://www.arkivdigital.net/swedish-genealogy/fattigbevis (Link)
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/certificate-of-poverty-fattigbevis-in-stockholm-city (Link)
    http://blog.arkivdigital.net/introduction-to-the-certificate-of-poverty-fattigbevis (Link)

ArkivDigital

Abbreviations in the Swedish Church Books

The Swedish church books are wonderful records. Most of the time, one can follow one’s ancestor from birth to emigration or death in the church books using a combination of the vital records (birth, marriage and death), household/congregation books and sometimes the moving records.

At conferences and presentations, we receive many questions about researching in the church books and some will ask about abbreviations they have encountered in their research. One common question is what do the abbreviations “GB” and “NB” mean?

  • GB is the abbreviation for gamla bok or old book.
  • NB is the abbreviation for nya bok or new book.

Often in the household books/congregation books in the latter nineteenth century and twentieth century you will see these abbreviations in the moving in and moving out columns. In the record shown below, you see the abbreviation “GB 124” in the moving in column (Hitflyttad) and the abbreviation “NB 166” in the moving out column (Bortflyttad) for Anders Johansson and his family who are living at Torpet Stubben in Barkeryd parish in Jönköping county. This record is in the household book for Barkeryd parish for the years 1891-1899.

GB and NB exampleBarkeryd (F) AI:25 (1891-1899) Image 226 / page 212 (AID: v18935.b226.s212, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

In this case, the abbreviation “GB 124” is stating that we can find the family in the previous household book on page 124 or in the household book Barkeryd (F) AI:24(1885-1890) on page 124 as shown in the image below.

previous GB exampleBarkeryd (F) AI:24 (1885-1890) Image 136 / page 124 (AID: v18934.b136.s124, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

The abbreviation “NB 166” is stating that we can find the family in the subsequent household book on page 166 or in the book Barkeryd (F) AIIa:1 (1900-1905) on page 166 as shown in the image below.

second NB exampleBarkeryd (F) AIIa:1 (1900-1905) Image 176 / page 166 (AID: v168900.b176.s166, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

ArkivDigital

ArkivDigital Visits Iowa

stor-logo-600x452px-namn-och-symbol transparent

The Iowa Genealogical Society will be sponsoring a Swedish Day in Des Moines, Iowa, on Saturday, November 14th.  Kathy Meade of ArkivDigital will be giving three presentations:

  • Have Swedish Roots and don’t know how to get started?
  • Using Swedish Church Records – A Case Study using ArkivDigital
  • More Swedish Records online with ArkivDigital

This will be a great opportunity to learn how to research your Swedish roots using ArkivDigital as well as discovering the wealth of records in ArkivDigital’s online library. Tips will be given both for the beginner and advanced researcher.

For more information and registration, click here.

ArkivDigital