Moving Certificates

karlskrona-moving-recordKarlskrona amiralitetsförsamling HII:1 (1773-1809) Image 80 (AID: v249317.b80, NAD: SE/LLA/13200) Link.

Whenever a person moved from one parish to another, the minister gave a moving out certificate to the person moving to give to the minister at the new parish. Sometimes, it was a brief notation that included the person’s name and what was considered important to know such as information that the person had fulfilled their duty to receive Holy Communion and marital status. Above is an example from Karlskrona in 1785.

However, in many places even in the 1700’s, preprinted forms existed with lines for dates and places of birth, reading knowledge and proof of receiving of Holy Communion. In addition, often there was a line such as “Är till vande” or something similar referring to the person’s character or morals. This line is interesting because the priest often wrote down his opinion about the person. These opinions often mirror the times and the minister’s views about morality.

moving-out-certificateKarlskrona amiralitetsförsamling HII:31 (1855-1855) Image 1190 (AID: v249347.b1190, NAD: SE/LLA/13200) Link.

An example of this in the above example where the Pigan (maid) Anna Maria Hultberg moved from Karlskrona Stadsförsamling to Karlskrona Amiralitetsförsamling in 1855. Her character is mentioned as ”sålunda att hon eger en oäkta son Carl August” or that she has an illegitimate son, Carl August. It also could be interpreted that the minister considered her to be promiscuous.

One can also note that a completely filled out certificate would include birth date, birth place and parents’ names. Not all the moving certificates have been preserved but they can be a very good source for researchers in tracing a person backwards in time.

The original article was written in Swedish by Örjan Hedenberg. Click here for original in Swedish.

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ArkivDigital launches two new powerful registers

ArkivDigital has recently launched two new powerful registers:

  • Population of Sweden 1880-1920
  • Population of Sweden 1960

If you wish to access these new registers, subscribe to our All-in-one subscription, which gives you access to all the historical documents in ArkivDigital along with these new registers. In order to access the registers, you will need to install our new software, ArkivDigital 2.0 beta. You can download the software from our website: http://www.arkivdigital.net/products/adonline/installation

Population of Sweden 1880-1920

The Population of Sweden 1880-1920 is a digital searchable name register of all of the Swedish household records and congregation books from around 1880 to 1920. In other words:  A fantastic tool for solving those genealogical mysteries in your family tree!

Whatever happened to your great-grandfather’s little brother?  His name appeared in an 1860’s household record, but then he vanished. Surely, he moved somewhere. But where?

This tool is the first one to employ as you pursue an answer.   You can search for a person by name, birth date, or other characteristics and you will see a result list of possible candidates. Click on a good possibility and you will pull up a transcription of that person’s complete information along with a link to the original record.

You may have the answer before you can say, “There’s Great Uncle Sven!”

The register is created in partnership with MyHeritage.

Sweden Population 1888Searching in Population of Sweden 1880-1920

 Population of Sweden 1960

The 1960 Swedish Census index is a wonderful source for those seeking information about people living in Sweden during the middle of the last century.  This census is drawn from the country’s tax register published in 1961 using data collected late in the previous year and includes everyone who then lived in Sweden.

The register is searchable by name and includes full name, birth date and birth parish, marital status, and information about their place of residence. Individuals are grouped by households, though the relationships among those living together are not stated. Nonetheless, it is often possible to infer additional information.  If a man and woman in the same household have the same marriage date, for example, they most likely are married to each other.

Additional information in the database includes the maiden name of married women and the place of registration in the previous tax register. Usually, there is a link to the first image of the parish birth book that will contain the person’s birth record.

1960 Swedish CensusPopulation of Sweden 1960

Read blog entry in Swedish.

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Swedish American Church documents provide genealogical information

 

hanepictureWe have written previously about the Swedish American church books in ArkivDigital. (See previous blog entry). Besides the church books, there are anniversary documents for many congregations and these publications often contain historical information about the congregation’s founding as well as genealogical information about some of the early church members. This information can help one jump the pond and trace the family in the Swedish church books. For many North Americans, one source for finding out where their ancestor came from in Sweden is often a Swedish American church book.

One interesting document is the one produced for the Centennial Anniversary of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bucklin, Missouri in 1970. Here you will find historical information for several families. One example is for Andrew Fredrick Hane’s family.

The text below states that he was born on “June 23, 1828 in Ostergutland, Sweden” and that he immigrated to American in 1880 with his wife Maria, born on “October 15, 1840, Grosmark, Varmland, Sweden” with four children. At the top of the page, you will find an image of Andrew, Maria and a child.

andrewhanetext
Bucklin Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church, Missouri, USA Vol:1 (1870-1970) Image 13 / page 13 (AID: v811754.b13.s13) Link.

We can find information about the family in the Swedish church books by using Maria as our starting point. The text provides information about Maria’s birth date, birth parish and immigration year. When one looks at the American records, often there is an Americanization of Swedish person and place names. In this case Grosmark, Varmland refers to Gräsmark, Värmland. As well, the county of Östergotland was spelled Ostergutland.

To search for Maria in the Swedish church books, we will begin by looking for her birth record.

  • Go to the search window.
  • Select the county archive and select Värmland.
  • Select the parish, Gräsmark.
  • Look for the birth volume that contains the year 1840.
  • Search for a birth record for Maria on October 15, 1840.
  • You will find record at the following reference: Gräsmark CI:5 (1838-1859) Image 18 / page 29 (AID: v6598.b18.s29, NAD: SE/VA/13165) (Link).

By tracing Maria in the church books forward, you will find that she marries Anders Fredrik Hane and they have several children and in 1880 the family immigrates to North American from Skedevi, Östergotland. You can see the notation about the move to North America in the household record shown below.

hane moving out recordSkedevi AI:25 (1880-1887) Image 128 / page 118 (AID: v29036.b128.s118, NAD: SE/VALA/00332) Link.

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Catechetical records in the diocese of Lund

As part of the Peace Treaty of Roskilde in 1658, Skåne and Blekinge were ceded to Sweden from Denmark. There was a transitional period where the population could continue to use the Danish language before Swedish was required as the official language. The catechetical records are an important source for reviewing the transition from the Danish language to Swedish.

By 1683, the transitional period was mainly over and the Swedish language had been introduced in practically all of  Skåne and Blekinge. In particular this is clearly shown in the court books. But we even see this in the church books especially in the catechetical books.

In the catechetical records, you will see the person’s name, age, notations about their religious understanding and in some records the language they spoke. These records show the transition from Danish to Swedish. Also, in some records, there will be a notation of the person’s place of birth.

You will find the catechetical records for the diocese of Lund (Skåne and Blekinge) in the respective parish archive noted as Kat.1 catechetical records.

lund catecheticalStrövelstorp Kat:1 (1692-1780) Image 11 / page 457 (AID: v115908.b11.s457, NAD: SE/LLA/13377) Link.

In the above image we see the following:

In Kärra number 1 in Strövelstorp parish in Skåne, the following persons live there in 1721:

Påhl Jönsson, born in Höja, 53 years old
wife Elina, born in the same place (Höja), 29 years old
son Jöns, born in Strövelstorp, 24 years old
son Pär, born in the same place (Strövelstorp), 22 years old
maid  Bengta, born in the same place  (Strövelstorp), 20 years old

In Kärra number 2 lives:
Pär Pärsson, born in Ausås, 76 years old
daughter Sissa, born in Strövelstorp, 55 years old

This record is particularly interesting because there is a column on the right, Tungsmåhlet, which states what language the person speaks. All at Kärra number 1 and daughter Sissa at number 2 speak Swedish, but Par Pärsson speaks Danish. He is 76 years old and was born around 1645 which was during the Danish period.

The original article was published in Swedish on April 17, 2014. Read original article in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Rosenstein and his Wife 1803

manskog drawingMangskog AI:6 (1786-1789) Image 84 / page 97 (AID: v12112.b84.s97, NAD: SE/VA/13359) Link.

The household examination records are a treasure for the Swedish researcher. These records were updated yearly and contain much detail about each household member. Using the household records along with other church book records, one can often trace a person’s whereabouts from birth to death or birth to emigration.

But occasionally as you browse through a book, you may be surprised to see a drawing or an image that will cause you to smile or even laugh.  Above is an image in the Mangskog household book (1786-1789) titled, “Rosenstein och hans Fru 1803” or “Rosenstein and his wife 1803”.

One wonders why the minister drew the picture of this couple or maybe his children found the book and made the drawings. You will find more delightful drawings in this book. Take a look on the following pages: 9, 12, 21, 42, 49, 61, 78, 135, 146 and finally the horses on page 152.

See blog entry in Swedish.

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