Modern church books from Värmland are now available

varmland 1945Eda C:15 (1930-1945) Image 1040 / page 96 (AID: v169605.b1040.s96, NAD: SE/VA/13091) Link.

In our blog posting on January 22 (read previous blog), we announced  the good news  that the Swedish National Archives has changed a previous decision which prohibited ArkivDigital from photographing some church books after 1935. Now we have the opportunity to photograph the modern church books up to the time of the law of privacy limits (currently 1945).

As soon as we received this wonderful news, we quickly began photographing the newer church books including congregation records, moving in/out registers, birth, marriage and death books. We are happy to announce that we have added all the church books up to the law of privacy limitations for Värmland county. In addition, we have added newer church records in other counties.

We will post in the blog when additional counties are complete. For more information about the contents in our digital library, click here.

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Name Registers

Name RegisterSläktnamnsregister Skaraborg SlReg:2 (0-1800) Image 6 / page 2 (AID: v187522.b6.s2, NAD: SE/GLA/75003) Link.

For those who research in Göteborg och Bohus, Skaraborg, Älvsborg, Värmland or Västernorrland counties, we wish to point out name registers (släktnamnsregister) that are accessible on ArkivDigital. If one is searching for a person who has a non-patronymic name meaning a name that does not end with a “son” or “dotter”, these registers can be very helpful. Examples of groups of people who had a non-patronymic name were the nobility, priests and not least the many soldiers.

Above is an image from the name register volume for household records for Dimbo härad in Skaraborg county.  If you were searching for Christina Aminoff shown in the above image, you would find her in the household book for Varv parish in Skaraborg county on page 38 in volume AI:2. To search for a name and then to be directed to the page number in the household record naturally saves much time.

The name registers cover normally the period from the beginning of the church books until the year 1800. For Västernorrland, however, the register continues until 1830 (for Medelpad and norra Ångermanland) and respectively to 1856 (for södra Ångermanland). The type of church books which registers exist vary from place to place.  There are registers for household records, moving in-out records, birth, marriage and death records but this varies from county to county and district (härad) to district as to what type of registers are available for that area.

You can find these registers in ArkivDigital by typing in “Släktnamnsregister” in the search box and click search or you can select “advanced options” and search for registers in the archive type selection.  These registers are divided into six archives, one for each county with the exception for Älvsborg county which has separate archives for Dalsland and Västgötadelen.

Read the original article in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Household record search and reading example

In a previous blog, we searched for the birth record of Elin Andersdotter who was born on the 13th of July 1841 in Västra Torsås parish in Kronoberg county.  In the birth record, we discovered her parents were Anders Nilsson and Ingrid Magnisdotter and that they resided at a place in the parish named Långasten.

Today, we will search for the family in the household records. Each pastor was required to take a yearly accounting of all members in his parish and test them for their religious understanding. In order to do this accounting, the minister made lists of all the people living in the parish, household by household. These records were kept in large books and each volume covers a series of years.  The number of years vary by parish and time. Many of these books begin in the late 1700’s but they do exist earlier for some parishes. By using the household records and congregation books, one can often trace a person from birth to death or birth to emigration.

search for household record

To search for the household records for 1841:

  • Return to the archive for Västra Torsås as shown in the above image.
  • Search for a household records volume that includes 1841.
  • Highlight the book Västra Torsås AI:6 1840-1847.
  • Double click and open the book.
  • Look for a place name index (ortsregister). This is usually in the front of the book but sometimes is in the back. Not all household records books have an index. In those cases you will need to page through the book to locate the place.

place name indexVästra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 8 (AID: v21256.b8, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

  • Search for the Elin’s residence, Långasten, in the place name index and you see that the records for this place begin on page 396 and 401 as shown in the above image.
  • Go to page 396 and begin your search for the family.

household imageVästra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 409 / page 396 (AID: v21256.b409.s396, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

You will find the family on page 396. In the first column on the top line is the place name, No. 69 Långasten. The first column shows the family member names living in the household during the period the book covers.

The major column headings on this household record are:

  • Födelse  –  Birth
  • Flyttningar – Moving (Moves in and out)
  • Läser  –   Read
  • Nattvardsgång -  Communion
  • Husförhör – Household examination
  • Omständigheter – Special circumstances or special remarks

Under the birth (födelse) column you will see the sub-columns, dag, år and ort which respectively mean day, year and place. In these columns, you will find the birth dates and birth places for each member of the household. In this case you notice that only the birth year is shown for the father while complete birth dates are shown for the rest of the family.

Below is a list of all the household members’ names and birth dates:

Name                                      Birth Date
B. M. Anders Nilssson           1798  (B. is an abbreviation for bonde or famer; M. – husband)
H. Ingjerd Magnisdotter      13 April 1797 (H. is an abbreviation for hustru or wife)
o ä D. Stina Johansdotter     11 March 1820 (Ingjerd’s illegitimate daughter)
o ä S. Magus Olsson               28 April 1845 (Stina’s illegitimate son)
S. Nils Andersson                     7 November 1827 (S. is the abbreviation for son)
D. Ingrid                                  28 January 1830 (D. is the abbreviation for daughter)
D. Catherina                            24 December 1838
D. Elin                                       13 July 1841

Usually, you will find the name of the parish in the birth place column. Sometimes, it will be a village name or sometimes the county name or a country. But in most cases, it is the parish name. In this case there is no entry and that usually but not always means the birth was recorded in the same parish as the household record so in this case, Västra Torsås. We do know that is true for Elin’s birth record. To search for the birth records for other members in the family, we should first look for their birth records in Västra Torsås.

The moving in and moving out columns (flyttningar) are very important columns. The columns indicate if the person has moved into or out of this place during the period the household records book covers or in this case 1840-1847.  The moving in columns include the year (år) and from location (ifrån) and the moving to columns are year (år) and to place (till).

You will notice that there is an entry in the moving to column for Stina Johansdotter and her son Magnus Olsson. It states that they moved to a place that is shown on page 373 in the same book in 1848. Also, you will note their names are crossed out. A cross out indicates a person has moved or died.  In order to find them at their new residence, go to page 373 in the same book. You will find them at the following reference in ArkivDigital:  Västra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 386 / page 373 (AID: v21256.b386.s373, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

There are no entries in the moving in or moving out columns for the other members of the household. Since there are no notations of a move, we can assume that they lived in the same place, No. 69 Långasten, in the previous household records book and in the subsequent one.  We can trace the family both backwards and forward by looking for the place, Långasten, in the place name index in the previous and subsequent household records books and look for the family in the same manner as we did in this book.

The last column, Omständigheter or special circumstances, can offer some additional information about your ancestor. In this case, you will see the following noted for Stina Johansdotter:

Transcription
Lysn. d. 6/5 48  med Torp. Jöns Svensson

Translation
Banns of marriage date 6 of May 1848 for marriage with Torpare (Crofter) Jöns Svensson

Click here for more information about household records plus a record example in the Swedish genealogy section of our website.

ArkivDigital

Swedish Parish Records in Paris now on ArkivDigital

sofia in paris
Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen i Paris AV:1 (0-9999) Image 40 (AID: v793349.b40, NAD: AD/PARIS/0001)

Sweden’s oldest international parish, Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen, is in Paris, France. The Swedish church presence in Paris dates back to 1626, when Professor Jonas Hambraeus at the Paris Academy began to gather Swedish and German Lutherans for worship services. The parish services were both in Swedish and German. On Sunday, worship services were usually held first in Swedish and then in German. Knowing this, it is easy to understand why the oldest books in the church’s archive are written in German as the above image out of one of the books from the 1600’s shows.

The Swedish parish in Paris existed from the end of the 1600’s to 1806 as an embassy church. The parish did not have a permanent location for services and moved around between the diplomatic envoys’ different residences. At the time of Napoleon Bonaparte’s crowning in 1806, the parish minister received an order to leave the country. For the years up to 1806, there are three volumes available on ArkivDigital: 2 parish registers (församlingsregister) volumes AV: 1-2 (written in German) and a marriage book for the years, 1764-1806. A large portion of the marriage book is written in French.

In the autumn of 1858, the embassy preacher Thor Frithiof Grafström was sent to Paris. At the time, there was the Union between Sweden and Norway and Grafström’s commission was to establish a Swedish-Norwegian parish. The volume, Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen i Paris AI:1, includes various types of documents from the Swedish-Norwegian parish in Paris during the years 1859-1863.

During the period 1863-1877, there was no Swedish priest in Paris. Since 1877 when Emil Flygare became the minister in Paris, the Swedish church presence in Paris has continued without interruption. The parish received its current name in 1878 when the first church, Sofiakapellet, was consecrated and named after the Swedish queen, Sofia of Nassau. The current Swedish parish church, Sofiakyrkan, was consecrated in 1913.

Most of the volumes for the Sofia parish in Paris are after 1877. These volumes include household examination/congregation books, migration records, birth, marriage and death books along with many other types of documents.

Read the original article published in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Research in Stockholm City 1878-1926

A question that is often asked at conferences and lectures is, “Why are there not any household examination books for Stockholm city parishes at the end of the 1800’s?”  The answer is simple. No household examination records were produced so they do not exist.

Researching in the cities is a little different from researching in the rural areas. And Stockholm research has some unique challenges because of the non-existence of the household examination records beginning in the late 1870’s.   Instead of the household examination books and congregation books for the years 1878-1926, there exists a population register in Stockholm called the roteman’s archive (rotemansarkivet).

Stockholm grew rapidly during the second half of the 19th century and it was common for individuals to frequently move. In order to maintain an accurate population register, a new municipal organization was created called the Roteman’s Institution (rotemansinstitutionen). Stockholm was divided into a number of districts called rotar.  In each district or rote, there was a city employee (roteman) responsible for recording the population statistics.  All who lived in a real estate property (fastighet) were registered in a special ledger.

Currently, the Stockholm City Archives is in the process of digitizing these records and making the material searchable online for free at the Stockholm City Archives site.  While not all the records have been registered, much has been completed and is now available online. This is an extremely valuable resource for Stockholm research. However, it is important to remember that this is a register and there is always a possibility of an error.

Other church books such as the birth, marriage, death, moving in and moving out records exist for Stockholm parishes and these are found in ArkivDigital. The moving in/out records for Stockholm are a very good source because these often contain more information than the moving in/out records for rural areas.

As in other cities, there are many parishes in Stockholm and not all have Stockholm in their name. Therefore, it is sometimes difficult to identify which parishes exist in the city of Stockholm. You can create a list of Stockholm city only parishes by doing the following:

  1. In ArkivDigital, click on the advanced options search button
  2. Select county, Stockholm stads
  3. Select archive type, parish/congregation

stockholm city research

To search in the roteman’s archive on the Stockholm’s city archives site, click here.  Click on the English flag for the English version.

ArkivDigital

 

New Records on ArkivDigital

Produktkatalog

 

Recently, we performed a major update of our online archive and many new records are now available. Below is a summary of the major updates.

Church Books
For those of you who have Swedish relatives who have lived in London, England, we have added the church records for the Swedish parish in London, Ulrika Eleonora, to the online archive. You will find these in the archive for Ulrika Eleonora församling (London).  In addition to household examination/congregation books, moving, birth, marriage and death records we have added other documents such as the attachments to the moving records, parish administration records and parish accounts.

Estate Inventories (Bouppteckningar)
Our photographing of the estate inventories for the 1900’s is going at full speed and many newly photographed images are now online. Before Christmas, we will be publishing a blog giving a status of the estate inventory photographing for each county. Watch out for the blog.

Population/Tax Registers (Mantalslängder)
The county tax/population registers from earliest times to 1820 for Kopparberg and Västmanland counties are now available. For the same time period, the district tax registers (häradsskrivarens exemplar av mantalslängder) or copies of tax/census records for Kronoberg county are now available.

Other Records
The bankruptcy cases for Gotland county from the earliest times up to 1940 are now available. However, some of the volumes are missing from Gotlands norra häradsrätt or district court since they were damaged by fire and are in too poor a condition to be photographed.

Other material that is currently being added are the Supreme Court protocols for the years 1737 to 1751 and the prison lists for all of Sweden from the Office of the Chancellor of Justice for the years 1801 to 1805.

Click here to find out what is available on ArkivDigital.

ArkivDigital

 

Using the Table of Contents in the Swedish Church Books

When you are researching in the Swedish church books in ArkivDigital, many times you will discover that some Swedish church books contain multiple types of records. You may find birth, marriage, death, moving in and moving out records in the same volume. Many books but not all contain a table of contents (Innehåll) but this may not be immediately obvious if your native language is not Swedish.

Before searching for a record in a volume, one should always check for the presence of a table of contents (Innehåll).  If one exists, the table of contents (Innehåll) is usually located in the front of the book and will show the page numbers where you can find the various record types.  Below is an example from a birth and christenings book for Kärna parish in Östergotland county.

Table of Contents

Kärna CI:3 (1808-1856) Image 3 / page 1 (AID: v38617.b3.s1, NAD: SE/VALA/00208)
Link

Transcription
Innehåll
Födelse-  och doplängd  6/1 1808 – 25/12 1856____________________pag. 4 -231;
Vigesllängd 27/3 1808 – 30/12 1856________________________        ”  233-294;
Död- och begrafningslängd 4/1 1808 – 28/11 1856________________     ” 295-427.

Translation
Table of Contents
Birth and baptismal records  January 6, 1808 – December 25, 1856____page 4-231;
Marriage records   March 27, 1808 – December 30, 1856___________  “ 233-294;
Death and burial records  January 4, 1808 – November 28, 1856_______”295-427.

The table of contents shows the page numbers where you can find each set of records that are in this book: birth, marriage and death records as well as the date coverage. Thus if we were looking for a death record in 1808 for Kärna parish, we would go directly to page 295 to begin the search.

While not all books include a table of contents and in those cases you may need to browse through the book to find the correct section, we recommend that you develop a habit of always checking for the existence of a table of contents (Innehåll) in a volume to help your search.

ArkivDigital 

Mother Parish and Annex Parishes (Moder- och annexförsamlingar)

The pastorat is a geographical area that a minister has responsibility for within the Swedish Lutheran Church. The pastorat may include one or multiple parishes or congregations. This means that a minister might have had administrative responsibility for several parishes at the same time. If there are multiple parishes in a pastorat, the parish where the minister lives is called the moderförsamling or mother parish and the other parishes are each called annexförsamling or annex parish.

When a minister had responsibility for multiple parishes, he would usually store all the parish books together and sometimes he would record a birth record in the wrong book or note an incorrect place on a moving certificate. Thus if you are tracing a person and can’t locate a record in the parish book where you think that it should be recorded, you should check to see if the parish is a mother or annex parish.

You will find information if the parish was a moderförsamling (mother parish) or an annexförsamling (annex parish) in the info box in the upper left hand side of the search window in ArkivDigital.

Example:
Anders Ström moved with his family from Holltorp Blankgården in Naum parish and the priest noted in the moving out column in the household examination book that the family moved to the parish Vara in Skaraborg county in 1881. When one looks at the Vara moving in records for 1881, there is no record of the family moving in. Does Vara belong to a pastorat with multiple parishes?

By reviewing the info box in the search window, we can see that Vara was an annex parish in Skarstad, Hällum, Vara and Önum pastorat.

VarainfoboxTranslation:
Since May 1, 1920 Vara is the mother parish in Vara, Skarstad, Hällum and Önum pastorat.
Before May 1, 1920, Vara was an annex parish in Skarstad, Hällum, Vara and Önum pastorat.

One should look at the moving in records for 1881 in these parishes. In this case, you will find the family in the moving in records for Skarstad in 1881.Skarstad Moving In recordSkarstad B:3 (1860-1889) Image 37 / page 70 (AID: v12684.b37.s70, NAD: SE/GLA/13473)
Link

The moving in book shows that you will find the family under Råckgården on page 53 in the Skarstad household examination book. This can be confirmed in the following household examination reference. Skarstad AI:8 (1880-1894) Image 59 / page 53 (AID: v12668.b59.s53, NAD: SE/GLA/13473).
Link

ArkivDigital

Swedish Church Book Tutorials

Swedish GenealogyThe Swedish church books are usually the first Swedish records that one uses when tracing one’s Swedish roots. These records are a “gold mine” because they are so complete and contain such detailed information. In many cases, one can trace a person’s life in the church books from birth to death or birth to emigration.

We often hear from many people who have Swedish ancestry but don’t speak Swedish, that they are intimidated by the Swedish church books because they are in Swedish. But there is no need to be. The church books consist primarily of tables of names, places and dates. Yes, there are Swedish words but these words are used repeatedly. Once one becomes familiar with the commonly used words, researching in the church books becomes relatively easy.

On our website, you will find a section titled, Swedish Genealogy. In this section, you will find record examples and translations for birth, marriage, death, household examination and moving records and much more.

Introduction to Swedish Church Books
Birth Record Examples
Marriage Record Examples
Death Record Examples
Household Examination Record Examples
Moving in and Moving out Records

Death record example

Image above: 1700s death record example. Go to page.

Kathy Meade, ArkivDigital USA