Stockholm City Church Book Registers

Researching in the larger cities can often be both difficult and time consuming. For those who research in Stockholm city, there is now a welcome addition in ArkivDigital, name registers for many of the Stockholm city church books.

During the fall, ArkivDigital had added church registers for the parishes in Stockholm city. We have published registers for birth, marriage, death books as well as household and moving in/out books. The registers are found in the archives for the respective parishes (in the form of images and currently the registers are not searchable by name). The types of registers and years covered vary by parish.

The registers that we have photographed are typewritten and were created by the Stockholm city archives. In addition to these registers, you will find in many of the Stockholm city parishes older, handwritten name registers that were created by the respective parish.

Stockholm city registerA page out the Klara parish death book register for the years 1748-1860. The register is organized alphabetically and gives a reference to the volume and page number where you will find the complete record. Link.

The information given in the above death register includes the deceased’s name, occupation or title, death date, burial date, church book volume and page number.

In the example for Mathilda Erica Lindberg (enclosed in a red box), the following information is shown:

  • Name – Mathilda Erica
  • Title – Maid (piga)
  • Death Date – 13 July 1848
  • Burial Date – 16 July
  • Church book volume – FIa:9
  • Page number – 15

Thus, one just needs to return to the Klara parish archive and search for the volume FIa:9, open the book and go to page 15. There you will find the complete death record as shown in the image below.

stockholm death 2Klara (AB, A) FIa:9 (1848-1860) Image 12 / page 16 (AID: v87412.b12.s16, NAD: SE/SSA/0010) Link.

Read the original blog in Swedish by clicking here.

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Population of Sweden 1880-1920 grows and now becomes 1860-1920

ArkivDigital’s largest and most popular searchable name index, Population of Sweden 1880-1920, is growing. The name index register has been expanded to include 20 additional years and now includes the years from 1860 to 1920.

The name register was already Sweden’s largest personal name register with 47 million entries. Mikael Karlsson, ArkivDigital’s managing director announced, “Now an additional 26 million posts have been added in partnership with MyHeritage. This makes the register more usable for family history researchers. Also, persons who disappeared in the 1860’s and 1870’s now can be easily tracked.”

The index, Population of Sweden 1860-1920, is a name searchable index of all the household books covering these years. This means that a person who has moved several times in his life, can be found posted in many entries, which means that the index is much larger than what the population of Sweden was at that time.

The index is not only the largest one that exists in Sweden; it is also the most user friendly and easiest to use. There is a direct link to the original source from the search result page. You click on the link and immediately you see your ancestor in the actual volume. It can’t get much easier!

1860 search

The index, Population of Sweden 1860-1920, is available in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription. In ArkivDigital’s web version, you click on “New index search” and then select Population of Sweden1860-1920 under “Index search”. Then you enter in the desired name in the search box below “Search index”. There are also advanced search possibilities.

If the name is unusual, it is often sufficient to only enter the first and last name but for more common names one should also enter additional information such as birth date and birth place. At first, one should enter minimum search information. If the search results are too many, then add additional search information until the search result list becomes manageable. Then click on the desired entry and all the details will be displayed. Under the heading “Links”, you will find a direct link to the actual record in the household book.

During the 19th century, the household books were the most important source for recording population information. The household books were organized geographically compiling data for each household in the congregation. Along with the other church books: birth, marriage, death moving in/out books, one gains a deep understanding of one’s ancestor. The household books were created for all parts of Sweden except for a number of the large congregations within Stockholm city. In Stockholm, another method, the roteman system, was used to record the population. Thus, many people who lived in Stockholm are missing in the Population of Sweden 1860-1920 index. One can search for people living in Stockholm in the Rotemansarkivet 1878-1926 which is available on the Stockholm City Archives website.

Read the announcement in Swedish by clicking here.

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Many tax registers in ArkivDigital

Old tax registers or population registers (mantalslängder) may not sound like a particular exciting research source. And many who look at tax registers are not easily impressed. Mostly just names, columns and numbers.

However, as we go back in time, the information in the household records becomes less detailed and the household records often do not exist in the late 1700’s or in prior times. It is at this time that the tax registers become a valuable source for the family researcher. Particularly useful are the tax or population registers (mantalslängderna), which begin around 1630.

The tax registers or population registers were created annually and are, like the household records, organized topographically by parish and village or farm. A single volume does not say so much. But when one follows the registers through a succession of years, one can follow developments and changes on a farm or village. This data can then be combined with the birth, marriage and death records, and often one can see the changes within a family nearly as clearly as if the household records had been preserved. The information in the tax registers or population registers varies over time and in different areas of the country.

tax register october 2017At the time around the change of the century between the 1700’s and 1800’s, there is often good information in the columns in the tax register. In the above tax register which refers to Nätra parish in the year, 1803, you will columns for taxes referring to pocket watches (fickur) (gold or silver) and the use of silk (sidentyg).

In ArkivDigital, you can find tax registers or population registers for all of Sweden from the beginning up until the 1800’s (often 1820). Several copies of tax registers or population registers (mantalslängder) were created and they are preserved in different archives. Thus, they can sometimes be difficult to find.

The first series are found with the local authorities. You can search for these in the following archives in the English interface in ArkivDigital:

  • District registrar (Swedish – häradsskrivare)
  • Alternative archives
    • Kronokamrer
    • Kronokassör
    • Mantalskontor
    • Taxation Authority (Swedish – Uppbördsverk)
    • Kommunalborgmästare
    • Crown bailiff (Swedish – kronofogde)

The second series is at the regional level or county level in the regional archives or search for the country archives in the English interface.

The third series are at the national level in Stockholm. In the English interface, search in the chamber archive. Or you can enter mantalslängder 1642–1820 or länsräkenskaper in the search box. For Stockholm city, you can find population registers and other tax register in the Överståthållarämbetets archive.

Concerning the third series of the tax registers or population registers those named Mantalslängder 1642-1820, we are prioritizing photographing volumes for the counties and years that are missing in the other series. This is an ongoing project and more volumes will be added online. For the first two series, the photographing is now complete.

ArkivDigital is working currently to make it simpler to find all these tax or population registers.

Read original blog in Swedish.

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Church Book Tutorials

At conferences, we receive many questions from our English-speaking customers on where to find examples for reading the church books. Today, we would like to point out that we have some tutorials on our website. In addition, we want to point out a wonderful website that includes some instructional videos on reading birth records from the late 1800’s back to the early 1700’s using ArkivDigital images.

On our English website, you will find a section titled, Swedish Genealogy. In this section, you will find record examples with transcriptions and translations for birth, marriage, death, household examination and moving records and much more. Below are links to these tutorials.

birth tutorial

Also, we would like to point out a wonderful website (swedishgenealogyguide.com) which is free that includes some wonderful instructional videos including among others “Reading Gothic Handwriting for Swedish Genealogy” and several videos showing examples of reading birth records.

Click here to link to the learning center which lists the instructional videos.

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Birth Record Reading Example

frossa birth recordForssa (D) C:1 (1682-1798) Image 59 / page 95 (AID: v55123.b59.s95, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Today, we will present a lesson in reading a birth record in the 1700’s. The above record is a birth record from 1762 in Forssa parish in Södermanland county. For many experienced researchers, this may appear to be clear and easy to read but for many new researchers this record may seem intimidating.

When looking at the birth records and the same can be said for marriage and death records one needs to become familiar with the minister’s format style for the record. In this case the minister has chosen the following format:

  1. Birth month
  2. Birth day
  3. Baptismal day
  4. Names of parents
  5. Name of the place of residence in the parish (e.g. farm, village, estate)
  6. Child’s Name
  7. Names of baptismal witnesses
  8. Entry number

In this case the child was born on the 12th of July 1762 and baptized on the 18th of July 1762. We know the year is 1762 because that is noted on the top of the page.

The minister has written the names of the parents: Per Andersson, h. Carin Persdotter. The abbreviation “h” is short for hustru or wife.

The place in the parish where the family lives is Stavsjöstugan. If you have difficulty in transcribing the place of residence, check to see if there is household book for that period and look in the place name index for a place that looks similar.

You will need the place name in the birth book to find the family in the household book. Below is the place name index for the corresponding household book You can see in the index at the bottom of the page that the household records for Stavsjöstugan begin on page 61. You will go to page 61 and then begin to look for the family.

The child’s name is Carin.

The names of the baptismal witnesses as written: Per Bengtsson i Spånga, dr. Carl Ericsson i Stavsjöstugan, hust. Maria Lars dtr i Spånga, pig. Cherstin Pers dtr ibidem.

The following abbreviations were used in recording the names of the witnesses:

  • i – in, at
  • dräng - farmhand
  • hust. –  abbreviation for hustru or wife
  • pig. – abbreviation for piga or maid
  • dtr – Often you will see “dtr” as an abbreviation for dotter or daughter in the name. The full names in this case are Maria Larsdotter and Cherstin Persdotter.
  • ibidem – Latin term meaning the same

The entry number 10 states that this was the 10th birth entry for the year.

You can see that one really doesn’t need to know Swedish to read the record. The record is primarily a table of names, dates and places. Yes, there are a few Swedish words but these words are used repeatedly in the church books so one just needs to become familiar with a few Swedish words to become comfortable reading the records.

ort name indexForssa (D) AI:2 (1757-1766) Image 5 (AID: v55102.b5, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Click here for more birth record reading examples.

ArkivDigital

Abbreviations in the Swedish Church Books

The Swedish church books are wonderful records. Most of the time, one can follow one’s ancestor from birth to emigration or death in the church books using a combination of the vital records (birth, marriage and death), household/congregation books and sometimes the moving records.

At conferences and presentations, we receive many questions about researching in the church books and some will ask about abbreviations they have encountered in their research. One common question is what do the abbreviations “GB” and “NB” mean?

  • GB is the abbreviation for gamla bok or old book.
  • NB is the abbreviation for nya bok or new book.

Often in the household books/congregation books in the latter nineteenth century and twentieth century you will see these abbreviations in the moving in and moving out columns. In the record shown below, you see the abbreviation “GB 124” in the moving in column (Hitflyttad) and the abbreviation “NB 166” in the moving out column (Bortflyttad) for Anders Johansson and his family who are living at Torpet Stubben in Barkeryd parish in Jönköping county. This record is in the household book for Barkeryd parish for the years 1891-1899.

GB and NB exampleBarkeryd (F) AI:25 (1891-1899) Image 226 / page 212 (AID: v18935.b226.s212, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

In this case, the abbreviation “GB 124” is stating that we can find the family in the previous household book on page 124 or in the household book Barkeryd (F) AI:24(1885-1890) on page 124 as shown in the image below.

previous GB exampleBarkeryd (F) AI:24 (1885-1890) Image 136 / page 124 (AID: v18934.b136.s124, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

The abbreviation “NB 166” is stating that we can find the family in the subsequent household book on page 166 or in the book Barkeryd (F) AIIa:1 (1900-1905) on page 166 as shown in the image below.

second NB exampleBarkeryd (F) AIIa:1 (1900-1905) Image 176 / page 166 (AID: v168900.b176.s166, NAD: SE/VALA/00025) (Link)

ArkivDigital

1946 SCB extracts (birth, death and marriage)

Now the Statistiska centralbyrån (Statistics Sweden) or SCB extracts for birth, marriage and death books for 1946 are accessible online with ArkivDigital. Because of privacy rules, we are seldom able to photograph the original birth, marriage and death books up to this date. The SCB extracts are a good replacement when the original books are not available.

scb 1946Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB) – Avdelningen för befolkningsstatistik 1:a avdelningen  H1AA:3671 (1946-1946) Image 750 (AID: v816356.b750, NAD: SE/RA/42040101) Link.

You will the SCB extracts in the archive: Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB) – Avdelningen för befolkningsstatistik 1:a avdelningen. The easiest way to search for the SCB extracts is to select archive search and enter “SCB” in the search box. The volumes are organized by county thus requiring one to browse through the book to find the correct parish. We plan to begin the indexing of these books so that it will be easy to locate each parish.

The SCB extracts from 1925 to 1945 were added at an earlier date. In an earlier blog, we published information about these records. Go to earlier blog.

Read original blog in Swedish.

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Sven Anderson’s Life in Bucklin, Missouri

ArkivDigital’s online library includes many Swedish American church books from Kansas and a few from Missouri and Oklahoma. While the record types will vary by parish, the most common sets of records found in the books include:

  1. Congregation records or church registers (Församlingsböcker)
  2. Birth and christening records (Födelse- och dopböcker)
  3. Marriage records (Vigselböcker)
  4. Death and burial records (Död- och begravningsböcker)
  5. Catechetical records (Konfirmationsbok)
  6. Protocols (Protokoll)
  7. Accountings (Räkenskaper)
  8. Member reception records (Intagna medlemmar)
  9. Member dismissal records (Utträdda medlemmar)
  10. Anniversary documents (Jubileumsskrift)

The anniversary or commemorative booklets for a church celebrating a number of years such as 25, 50, 75 or 100 years in existence can be very interesting to browse. Many present a short history of the church and even occasionally biographical sketches and photographs of early settlers. These can be wonderful sources for learning about the lives of early Swedish American settlers in North America.

 

The Bucklin, Missouri, Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church 100-year commemorative booklet includes a number of biographies of early church members. One of the biographies is for Sven Anderson who emigrated from Nydala parish in Jönköping County in 1869. Below is a photo of Sven and his wife, Matilda.

photo of sven anderson

Bucklin Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church, Missouri, USA (MO) Vol:1 (1870-1970) Image 10 / page 7 (AID: v811754.b10.s7, NAD: )  Link.

 

You will also find a short biographical sketch of Sven’s life in the new country. The sketch includes birth dates, birth places, emigration dates and death dates for both him and his wife along with information about their children. It also states, “In 1870, they came to Bucklin, Mo, and bought 40 acres of land north of Bucklin in the rolling hills of Mussel Fork from the Railroad Co. Sven being a skilled workman built a 3-room frame house with fireplace. The barn was made of logs with a prairie hay roof.” Below is the image of the written biography.

sven andersson biography

Bucklin Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church, Missouri, USA (MO) Vol:1 (1870-1970) Image 10 / page 7 (AID: v811754.b10.s7, NAD:)

 

You can find the commemorative booklet for the Bucklin Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  1. Select new archive search
  2. Click on county and select Missouri (USA) MO
  3. Select Bucklin Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church
  4. Select printed document 1870 – 1970

Below are links to additional blogs about the Swedish American church books:

Searching for a parish of origin in the Kansas church books

Swedish American Church books in Kansas

ArkivDigital

More modern church books in ArkivDigital

During January and February, we were busy photographing church books whose confidentiality or protection from the law of privacy expired at the end of last year. The volumes included are congregation books, birth and death records with an end year of 1946. In addition, we also photographed moving in and out books and marriage books with the starting year 1946 and year ending no later than 1980.

The photographing for Blekinge, Gotland, Halland, Jämtland, Jönköping, Kopparberg, Kristianstad, Kronoberg, Malmohus, Södermanland, Uppsala, Västmanland, Örebro and Östergötland counties are now complete. Newly photographed images from several other counties are now available online and more will be added in the near future.

1946 death recordÖdestugu (F) F:2 (1917-1946) Image 520 / page 49 (AID: v172844.b520.s49, NAD: SE/VALA/00473)  Link.

You can find more detail as to what volumes are available in ArkivDigital such as the modern church books and other types of volumes on our website, (link to website page).

Finally, we would also like to mention a few words about the birth and baptismal books.  In these books, it is common that notes may be added to a record, for example a note relating to an adoption, often decades after the event. The 70-year privacy law begins from the date of the last inserted note. For example, a note might have been entered in 1956 in a book containing birth records between 1930 and 1946. This means that the book is protected by the privacy law for 70 years after 1956 or it can’t be photographed until 2027.  So in some cases, we currently do not have the opportunity to photograph some of the birth and baptismal books even though they do not contain any birth records for persons born after 1946.

Read original article in Swedish.

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Life-long companions

lina and eric birth recordSäfsnäs (W) C:3 (1801-1844) Image 71 (AID: v132067.b71, NAD: SE/ULA/11506) Link.

As more people are living longer, it is not unusual to see more couples celebrating 60 years of marriage or their diamond anniversary. We have a couple of examples in the church books where couples have literally followed each other from the cradle to the grave.

One case is from Säfsnäs in Dalarna.  There are two children, Lena Stina Larsdotter and Eric Jansson who were born in 1812. They are listed next to each other in the birth and baptismal book, respectively numbers 59 and 60 as shown in the above image.

The two married and they are shown with children in the household record below.

eric and lena household recordSäfsnäs (W) AI:12 (1845-1854) Image 93 / page 88 (AID: v132047.b93.s88, NAD: SE/ULA/11506) Link.

Eric took the name Hök after Hökhöjden where he was born and where the couple first lived. He died in Mörttjärn on August 25, 1882. The couple had followed each other for 70 years.

The other case is from Västland in Uppland, where in1813 the children Maja Stina Löfgren (nr. 36) and Lars Persson (nr. 37) were born.

matts and maja birth recordVästland (C) C:4 (1803-1837) Image 44 (AID: v127256.b44, NAD: SE/ULA/11734) Link.

lars birth recordVästland (C) C:4 (1803-1837) Image 45 (AID: v127256.b45, NAD: SE/ULA/11734) Link.

Likewise, this couple married. In the household record below, however, Maja Stina’s birth month is noted incorrectly, August instead of September.

household record lars and wifeVästland (C) AI:12 (1846-1850) Image 266 / page 249 (AID: v127235.b266.s249, NAD: SE/ULA/11734) Link.

Lars took the name Wesslander (after Västland) and became a foundry worker at the Västland foundry. When he died on March 1871, he and his wife had followed each other for 58 years.

Maybe one can find more cases similar to these.

The original article was written by Örjan Hedenberg. Click here for original post in Swedish.

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