Search by name in the Swedish historical records!

One common question that one hears from Swedish-Americans new to Swedish records, “Are the records searchable by name?” Today, we can say that increasingly more and more Swedish records such as the church books, estate inventories and other record types are searchable by name.  One of ArkivDigital’s primary goals is to make Swedish research easier and one method is name searchable indexes.

search population of 1860 to 1947Searching in the Population of 1860 to 1947 Index

Today, we will review the name searchable indexes that are available in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription.

Church Books

  • Household/Congregations Books (Population of Sweden 1860-1947) – All of the household/congregation books for all of Sweden have been indexed by name for the years from 1860 to 1947. For more information, click here.
  • Birth, marriage and death book indexes – (Birth index- parts of Sweden, Marriage Index- parts of Sweden, Death index- parts of Sweden) Searchable name indexes for birth, marriage and death books for all of the parishes within Kronoberg county and some parishes in nearby counties, around 60 parishes in Södermanland county as well as Nederluleå parish in Norrbotten county. Most of these indexes are from the earliest times (1600’s) up to the second half of the nineteenth century. The end year varies by parish. For some parishes, the end year is 1920. This is an ongoing project and the goal is to index by name the birth, marriage and death books for all of Sweden. Click here for more information.

Estate Inventories (Inventory of estate)

  • Name searchable indexes exist for estate inventories from the following counties: Gotland, Gävleborg, Göteborg och Bohus, Jämtland, Jönköping, Kalmar, Kronoberg, Norrbotten, Stockholm, Uppsala, Värmland, Västerbotten, Västernorrland, Älvsborg and Östergötland. This is an ongoing project. For a complete list of the district and city courts that have been indexed, click here.

Swedish Census Indexes

  • ArkivDigital has searchable name indexes for the years 1950, 1960, 1975 and 1985. Click here for additional information.
    • Population of Sweden 1950
    • Population of Sweden 1960
    • Population of Sweden 1975
    • Population of Sweden 1985

Military records (Military Service Cards)

  • The Military Service Cards index is a name searchable index of all draft registration and service cards for those who served in the Swedish military between 1902 and 1941. Click here for more information.

Swedes in U.S. 1940 Census

  • The Swedes in U.S. 1940 Census index includes all the persons in the 1940 U.S. Census who stated that their birth place was Sweden. Click here for more information.

Other indexes

  • Portrait Collection – Collection of photographs from three Stockholm photography studios from the 1920’s to 1970’s. Click here for more information.
  • Agriculture Census 1944 - Index to 1944 year’s agriculture statistics done by Statistics Sweden (SCB). Click here for more information.

To access the name searchable indexes within ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription:

  • Access the web version by going to https://app.arkivdigital.se/
  • Select “Index Search”.
  • Select the desired index under “Index source”.

search by name

ArkivDigital

Ten years added to ArkivDigital’s largest name register!

Last fall, ArkivDigital’s largest name register became even larger. The Population of Sweden index grew by twenty years from 1880-1920 to 1860 to 1920. Now another decade has been added, so the register spans seventy years, from 1860 to 1930.

The Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is Sweden’s largest name register and includes now about 85 million register posts collected from 30,553 volumes. The register includes all persons who are named in Sweden’s household and congregation books created during those years. This means that a person who moved often will be found several times in the indexes, which explains why the register is many times greater that what Sweden’s population was at the time.

The register is not only the largest one that exists in Sweden, it is probably the easiest to use. All search results contain a direct link to the source. You click on the link and find immediately your relative in the original volume. Very smooth and easy!

1860-1920- Hulda ElisabetImage: Searching in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930

The register Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is included in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription. In ArkivDigital’s web version, you click “New index search” and select “Population of Sweden 1860-1930” under “Index source”. Then you can begin to search by entering the desired name in the search box under “Search index”.

If the name of the person is unusual, it is often enough just to enter the first and last name, but for more common names, for example for the name, Andersson, the birth date or the birthplace should be entered.

 

One should start with a broad search by entering as little as possible. If the search results are too many, add additional information until the search results become manageable. Then click on the desired entry and all the details will be displayed. Under the heading “Links” is a direct link to the original record in the original volume.

The household records (from the 1900’s called congregation books in English) were the most important set of public records, a generally geographically organized general register of residents in the parish where information from other church books (birth, marriage and death books, etc.) were noted along with additional information such as movements within or out of the parish.

 

These records were created for most of Sweden except for a few large parishes within Stockholm city. Instead during the years 1878-1926, a new municipal organization was created called the Roteman’s Institution (rotemansinstitutionen). Stockholm was divided into a number of districts called rotar.  In each district or rote, there was a city employee (roteman) responsible for recording the population statistics. Therefore, many people living in Stockholm are missing in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index. They can be found in the Rotemansarkivet 1878-1926 which is found on the Stockholm City Archives free website.

With the update of the Population in Sweden to 1930, ArkivDigital now has more than 100 million registry entries, easily accessible to anyone with an All-In-one subscription, and most of them with a link directly to the source.

 

Read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

 

Many church books from Nebraska are now online

During the summer, we published a blog that we were photographing Swedish American church books in Nebraska. See earlier blog. Since then, we have been working at full speed photographing and publishing the material.

We have photographed many types of documents, everything from congregation books, birth, marriage and death books to protocols, church accounts and much more. We have published over 110,000 images from 110 congregations. Still more material will be added in the future.

bertrand church

An image out of the Bertrand Immanuel Lutheran Church’s “Church-Register” for the years 1883-1907. For church members born in Sweden, both the birth parish and county are noted in the record. Link.

 

You can access these records by doing the following:

  • Select New archive search in ArkivDigital
  • Select County
  • Select Nebraska

Click here to read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Name Registers in Parish Archives

borasregister

In a previous blog entry, we pointed out name registers (släktnamnsregister) in ArkivDigital for those who research in Göteborg och Bohus, Skaraborg, Älvsborg, Värmland or Västernorrland counties. If one is searching for a person who has a non-patronymic name meaning a name that does not end with a “son” or “dotter”, these registers can be very helpful. Examples of groups of people who had a non-patronymic name were the nobility, priests and not least the many soldiers.

However, you will also find name registers for parish books in some parish archives which also include both patronymic and non-patronymic names. Whenever you research a parish, it is always recommended to browse the archive to see what types of volumes are included in the archive. Occasionally, you will see “register” or “personregister” volumes. For example, if you browse the Borås parish/congregation archive in Älvsborg county, you will see name registers for birth, marriage, death and household records. In this parish, there are name registers for the household records between 1745 and 1860 as shown in the above image. These can be very helpful in the search process.

Below is an example of a page from the household record register book for Borås for the years 1745 – 1754. To the right of the person is the page number where you can find the person in the household record book for the years 1745-1754.

household register imageBorås (P) HFReg:1 (1745-1754) Image 74 / page 70 (AID: v188594.b74.s70, NAD: SE/GLA/13048) Link.

Examples of a few other parish archives where you will find name registers for church books are:

  • Gävle Heliga Trefaldighet – Gävleborg
  • Göteborgs Karl Johan – Göteborg och Bohus
  • Göteborgs Kristine – Göteborg och Bohus
  • Uppsala domkyrkoförsamling – Uppsala

ArkivDigital

Stockholm Folk Register Cards (1926-1939)

Folkregister

If you are researching in Stockholm city during the period of 1926-1939, you will find the Stockholm Folk Register Cards helpful. You will find one set of cards for the recorded deaths in Stockholm and another set of cards showing movement (utflyttade). These records are found in the archive, “Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ)”

You can search for the records in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  • Go to ArkivDigital Online.
  • Open search window.
  • Click on advanced search.
  • Select Stockholms stad.
  • Select Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ).
  • Or you can enter “folkregister” in the search box and search.

These cards are organized alphabetically for the entire city of Stockholm. You do not need to know the parish where the person lived. However, the sorting is by phonetic spelling. For example both Carlsson’s and Karlsson’s are included in the K’s.

The death cards can be used as a type of person register for the death books. On the front side, you will find the deceased person’s death date, birth date and birth place. On the back side of the card you will find the address where the person lived at the time of his death.

The cards showing the movement of persons are also interesting. The example images below show both sides of the card. The front side of the card shows the head of the household, his wife and child with their birth dates and birth parish. The back side of the card shows the date they moved and the parish where they moved to along with the address.

utfllytade1(Front side) Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ) DVa2:1 (1926-1939) Image 490 (AID: v644688.b490, NAD: SE/SSA/6046) Link.

utflyttade2(Back side) Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ) DVa2:1 (1926-1939) Image 500 (AID: v644688.b500, NAD: SE/SSA/6046) Link.

Read more about the Stockholm city folk register cards here.

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Swedish congregations in Oslo and Berlin

Berlin ParishSvenska Victoriaförsamlingen i Berlin OI:3 (1926-1941) Image 4510 (AID: v793345.b4510, NAD: AD/BERLIN/0001) Link.

We have previously posted blogs about the Swedish congregations in Copenhagen and Paris: Svenska Gustafskrykan in Copenhagen and Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen in ParisWe also have records for Swedish congregations in other countries, namely Svenska Victoriaförsamlingen in Berlin, Germany, along with Svenska Margaretaförsamlingen in Oslo, Norway.

Both congregations were established in the beginning of the 1900’s. The birth books for the Oslo congregation begin in 1911 and the marriage and death books begin in 1912. In Berlin, the birth books begin in 1902 and the marriage and death books begin in 1903. For Berlin, there are also congregation books along with moving in and out registers which are missing for Oslo.

In addition to the common record types, we have photographed other types of documents for both the Berlin and Oslo congregations. An example of one is the Svenska Victoriaförsamlingen in Berlin OI: 3 volume which contains documents about church taxes from 1926 to 1941. Among the documents included are letters from church members who believe they do not have to pay a tax. The image above shows a letter from a woman who married a German man and thereby became a German citizen. Since she was required to pay a German church tax, she wrote that she no longer wanted to pay taxes to Victoriaförsamlingen.

Read the blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

A Midsummer Maypole

midsommarUndenäs C:1 (1689-1711) Image 94 / page 88 (AID: v16209.b94.s88, NAD: SE/GLA/13601) Link to image in ArkivDigital.

In the death books, one usually finds the cause of death for an individual.  While there are many causes, one often sees old age, tuberculosis, an unknown illness or the Latin medical term. The cause of death found in the record above is unusual but interesting because it shows that Midsummer has a long tradition in Sweden.

Swedish transcription
”1694. Lars i Skallebo ihiälslagen af en Missommar stångh d.16 Augusti och begrofs på kyrkog: d.26 ejusdem.”

English Translation
Lars in Skallebo was killed by a Midsummer maypole on the 16th of August and was buried in the church yard on the 26th of the same month.

We at ArkivDigital wish all a wonderful Midsummer. Glad Midsommar!

Original article in Swedish.

ArkivDigital