Name searching tips

The number of name searchable indexes in ArkivDigital continues to increase. Recently the Population of Sweden of 1975 and the military service card indexes were added. You can find these indexes by selecting “New Index Search” and then select the desired index under “Index source”.index search screen

There are two methods for searching: simple and advanced. Today, we will focus on the simple search which is more powerful than one might believe at first glance.

The key for all searches is not to write too much information. Begin with a broad search and then narrow the search.

One example: We will look for a woman named Berta Lungren. Select the index, Population of Sweden 1860-1930, and write in her name “Berta Lundgren” in the search field and click on “Search” (or press Enter). The result list shows 202 matches which feels like too many to search through.

berta lundgren

When I add her birth year to the search criteria, the number of matches is reduced to eight. Four of these refer to the woman I am interested in, born on the 3rd of March 1887 in Odensala. But if I look more closely in the match list, I see one that mentions the birth date as the 31st of March 1887 (which is her correct birth date). If I had entered her full birth date instead of only the year, I would have missed all the matches. Therefore, one should never write in more information than what is needed to get a good search result.

bertil 1887

It is also smart to search the same person using different information, for example only the last name and birth date or only the first name and birth date or only the first and last name (the last only works well with a name that is not common). These methods will increase the chances to find as many possible matches.

Now we will look at some more advanced search techniques.

There are a number of special search characters that can be used for searching.

An example: I want to search for a person named Anders Setterqvist, but I know that his last name can be spelled differently in the records: Setterqvist, Sätterqvist, and Zetterqvist. And sometimes quist is written as qvist. In addition, I have seen different birth years for him in the records.

One can write the following in the search box:
anders (zetterq* | sätterq* | setterq*) (1816 | 1817 | 1818)

The result will be a search of all these spellings and years. The vertical bar (|) means  “or” and the asterisk (*) is used as a wildcard showing all the names that include the letters preceding the asterisk. 

zetterquist

Following is a list of the special characters that can be used in ArkivDigital’s searches.

  • * (asterisk) An asterisk at the end of Bergl* will find Berglind, Bergling, Berglund, etc.
  • “ ” (quotation marks) = exact phrase For example “georg olof” will find Georg Olof but not Olof Georg or George Karl Olof.|
  • | (vertical mark) = or (See above explanation)
  • - (minus sign) = not - For example: -västra frölunda will find Östra Frölunda and Frölunda but not Västra Frölunda
  • + (plus sign) = and – For example: Lundqvist+Lundberg will find all posts which includes both names.
  • ~1 (tilde plus a number) after keyword = approximate search with numerical character difference – For example: appelqvist~1 will find in addition to Appelqvist, Appelquist, Appelkvist where one character or letter differs from the original keyword. If one increases number to 2 appelqvist~2, one will also find Apelquist.
  • ~1 tilde plus a number) after phrase = approximate search. An additional word may be found. (The first and last word in the phrase shall be mentioned). For example “sven filip”~1 finds also Sven Gustaf Filip and Sven Erik Filip. A search “sven filip”~2 will find in addition Sven Johan Olof Filip as well as Filip Sven.
  • ( ) parenthesis = searches for alternative spellings – For example aurora (concordia | conkordia | konkordia | koncordia) searches for all posts that includes Aurora Concordia, Aurora Conkordia, Aurora Konkordia and Aurora Koncordia).

These special characters work also with the Advanced search. The search possibilities are nearly infinite. All one has to do is try!

 Read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Ten years added to ArkivDigital’s largest name register!

Last fall, ArkivDigital’s largest name register became even larger. The Population of Sweden index grew by twenty years from 1880-1920 to 1860 to 1920. Now another decade has been added, so the register spans seventy years, from 1860 to 1930.

The Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is Sweden’s largest name register and includes now about 85 million register posts collected from 30,553 volumes. The register includes all persons who are named in Sweden’s household and congregation books created during those years. This means that a person who moved often will be found several times in the indexes, which explains why the register is many times greater that what Sweden’s population was at the time.

The register is not only the largest one that exists in Sweden, it is probably the easiest to use. All search results contain a direct link to the source. You click on the link and find immediately your relative in the original volume. Very smooth and easy!

1860-1920- Hulda ElisabetImage: Searching in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930

The register Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is included in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription. In ArkivDigital’s web version, you click “New index search” and select “Population of Sweden 1860-1930” under “Index source”. Then you can begin to search by entering the desired name in the search box under “Search index”.

If the name of the person is unusual, it is often enough just to enter the first and last name, but for more common names, for example for the name, Andersson, the birth date or the birthplace should be entered.

 

One should start with a broad search by entering as little as possible. If the search results are too many, add additional information until the search results become manageable. Then click on the desired entry and all the details will be displayed. Under the heading “Links” is a direct link to the original record in the original volume.

The household records (from the 1900’s called congregation books in English) were the most important set of public records, a generally geographically organized general register of residents in the parish where information from other church books (birth, marriage and death books, etc.) were noted along with additional information such as movements within or out of the parish.

 

These records were created for most of Sweden except for a few large parishes within Stockholm city. Instead during the years 1878-1926, a new municipal organization was created called the Roteman’s Institution (rotemansinstitutionen). Stockholm was divided into a number of districts called rotar.  In each district or rote, there was a city employee (roteman) responsible for recording the population statistics. Therefore, many people living in Stockholm are missing in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index. They can be found in the Rotemansarkivet 1878-1926 which is found on the Stockholm City Archives free website.

With the update of the Population in Sweden to 1930, ArkivDigital now has more than 100 million registry entries, easily accessible to anyone with an All-In-one subscription, and most of them with a link directly to the source.

 

Read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital