Tip for searching in the SCB extracts (birth, marriage death)

The Statistiska centralbyrån (Statistics Sweden) or SCB extracts for birth, marriage and death books between 1925 and 1947 are accessible online with ArkivDigital. We have written about these extracts in previous blogs. (See earlier blog).

These SCB extracts are organized by year, county, type of record and parish. In the past, these extracts were not indexed by parish within ArkivDigital, so one was required to browse the volume to locate the desired parish. Now, these volumes are indexed by parish.

For example, we only have original church death records for the parish of Dalhem in Kalmar county up to 1929 as shown in the below image. Thus, in order to see the death record for 1935, we should look at the 1935 SCB death extracts for Dalhem parish.

dalhem volume list

You will find the SCB extracts in the archive with the long name, Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB) – Avdelningen för befolkningsstatistik 1:a avdelningen. The easiest way to find this archive is to go to “New archive search” and enter “SCB” in the search box. See image below.

scb archive search

Each volume specifies which county and year it covers. To identify the county, roll your mouse over the “i” icon and the county name will appear. If nothing else is mentioned, the volume includes birth, marriage and death records for that year. In other cases, there may be an abbreviation specifying the types of records the volume includes. The abbreviations are: “fbu” (birth records), “vbu” (marriage records) and “dbu” (death records).

scb kalmar 1935

Open the volume and select the drop/down image/page list, you will see that parishes are indexed by parish name and type of book:

  • Födda – birth
  • Döda – death
  • Vigda – marriage

scb parish list

You can browse the list or you can filter the list by entering the name of the parish in the filter box.  Select the death book, click enter and go directly to the page.

filter dalhem

Below is the 1935 SCB death extract for Dalhem parish in Kalmar county.

dalhem death

Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB) – Avdelningen för befolkningsstatistik 1:a avdelningen H1AA:2854 (1935) Image 8910 (AID: v808399.b8910, NAD: SE/RA/42040101)

 

 

ArkivDigital

Gammalsvenskby’s church books now available in ArkivDigital

Gammalsvenskbys kyrkoböckeGammalsvenskby (Ukraina) (Ut) 8 (1920-1921) Image 160 / page 64 (AID: v99903.b160.s64, NAD: SE/ViLA/23094) Link.

In the Baltic Sea, west of Estonia’s mainland is the island of Dagö. There was a Swedish speaking peasant settlement on Dagö that was believed to have been founded in the 1200’s. Other Swedish settlements existed along Estonia’s coast and nearby islands. Dagö belonged to Sweden from 1563 to 1721 and was an important Swedish territory in Estonia.

Under the Treaty of Nystad in 1721, Dagö was ceded to Russia. In 1781, the Russian Empress Catherine II forced the resettlement of about 1,000 Dagö-Swedes to Ukraine. Many died during the long march but those who survived founded the community of Gammalsvenskby.

Despite nearly no contact with Sweden, the population of Gammalsvenskby preserved their traditions and Lutheran faith. They even retained the old “östsvenska” dialect. Towards the end of the 1800’s some contact with Sweden was restored and in 1885 a new Swedish church opened.

After the Russian Revolution in 1917 and a devastating famine, many Swedish colonists requested to leave the Soviet Union and return to Sweden. In 1929, 881 villagers arrived in Sweden; only a few chose to remain in Ukraine. Most of the returnees settled in Gotland.

Along with the returnees came the Gammalsvenskby’s church books. Pastor Kristofer Hoas was responsible for seeing  that these books were sent to Sweden. Up until his death in 1941, Pastor Hoas continued to send the church books to Sweden. In 1947, the archive was transferred to the county archives (today’s regional archive) in Visby, where we have recently photographed the documents.

You can find the Gammalsvenskby’s church books in ArkivDigital by entering Gammalsvenskby in the search box.

Read the original blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital