Many tax registers in ArkivDigital

Old tax registers or population registers (mantalslängder) may not sound like a particular exciting research source. And many who look at tax registers are not easily impressed. Mostly just names, columns and numbers.

However, as we go back in time, the information in the household records becomes less detailed and the household records often do not exist in the late 1700’s or in prior times. It is at this time that the tax registers become a valuable source for the family researcher. Particularly useful are the tax or population registers (mantalslängderna), which begin around 1630.

The tax registers or population registers were created annually and are, like the household records, organized topographically by parish and village or farm. A single volume does not say so much. But when one follows the registers through a succession of years, one can follow developments and changes on a farm or village. This data can then be combined with the birth, marriage and death records, and often one can see the changes within a family nearly as clearly as if the household records had been preserved. The information in the tax registers or population registers varies over time and in different areas of the country.

tax register october 2017At the time around the change of the century between the 1700’s and 1800’s, there is often good information in the columns in the tax register. In the above tax register which refers to Nätra parish in the year, 1803, you will columns for taxes referring to pocket watches (fickur) (gold or silver) and the use of silk (sidentyg).

In ArkivDigital, you can find tax registers or population registers for all of Sweden from the beginning up until the 1800’s (often 1820). Several copies of tax registers or population registers (mantalslängder) were created and they are preserved in different archives. Thus, they can sometimes be difficult to find.

The first series are found with the local authorities. You can search for these in the following archives in the English interface in ArkivDigital:

  • District registrar (Swedish – häradsskrivare)
  • Alternative archives
    • Kronokamrer
    • Kronokassör
    • Mantalskontor
    • Taxation Authority (Swedish – Uppbördsverk)
    • Kommunalborgmästare
    • Crown bailiff (Swedish – kronofogde)

The second series is at the regional level or county level in the regional archives or search for the country archives in the English interface.

The third series are at the national level in Stockholm. In the English interface, search in the chamber archive. Or you can enter mantalslängder 1642–1820 or länsräkenskaper in the search box. For Stockholm city, you can find population registers and other tax register in the Överståthållarämbetets archive.

Concerning the third series of the tax registers or population registers those named Mantalslängder 1642-1820, we are prioritizing photographing volumes for the counties and years that are missing in the other series. This is an ongoing project and more volumes will be added online. For the first two series, the photographing is now complete.

ArkivDigital is working currently to make it simpler to find all these tax or population registers.

Read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Church Book Tutorials

At conferences, we receive many questions from our English-speaking customers on where to find examples for reading the church books. Today, we would like to point out that we have some tutorials on our website. In addition, we want to point out a wonderful website that includes some instructional videos on reading birth records from the late 1800’s back to the early 1700’s using ArkivDigital images.

On our English website, you will find a section titled, Swedish Genealogy. In this section, you will find record examples with transcriptions and translations for birth, marriage, death, household examination and moving records and much more. Below are links to these tutorials.

birth tutorial

Also, we would like to point out a wonderful website (swedishgenealogyguide.com) which is free that includes some wonderful instructional videos including among others “Reading Gothic Handwriting for Swedish Genealogy” and several videos showing examples of reading birth records.

Click here to link to the learning center which lists the instructional videos.

ArkivDigital

Birth Record Reading Example

frossa birth recordForssa (D) C:1 (1682-1798) Image 59 / page 95 (AID: v55123.b59.s95, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Today, we will present a lesson in reading a birth record in the 1700’s. The above record is a birth record from 1762 in Forssa parish in Södermanland county. For many experienced researchers, this may appear to be clear and easy to read but for many new researchers this record may seem intimidating.

When looking at the birth records and the same can be said for marriage and death records one needs to become familiar with the minister’s format style for the record. In this case the minister has chosen the following format:

  1. Birth month
  2. Birth day
  3. Baptismal day
  4. Names of parents
  5. Name of the place of residence in the parish (e.g. farm, village, estate)
  6. Child’s Name
  7. Names of baptismal witnesses
  8. Entry number

In this case the child was born on the 12th of July 1762 and baptized on the 18th of July 1762. We know the year is 1762 because that is noted on the top of the page.

The minister has written the names of the parents: Per Andersson, h. Carin Persdotter. The abbreviation “h” is short for hustru or wife.

The place in the parish where the family lives is Stavsjöstugan. If you have difficulty in transcribing the place of residence, check to see if there is household book for that period and look in the place name index for a place that looks similar.

You will need the place name in the birth book to find the family in the household book. Below is the place name index for the corresponding household book You can see in the index at the bottom of the page that the household records for Stavsjöstugan begin on page 61. You will go to page 61 and then begin to look for the family.

The child’s name is Carin.

The names of the baptismal witnesses as written: Per Bengtsson i Spånga, dr. Carl Ericsson i Stavsjöstugan, hust. Maria Lars dtr i Spånga, pig. Cherstin Pers dtr ibidem.

The following abbreviations were used in recording the names of the witnesses:

  • i – in, at
  • dräng - farmhand
  • hust. –  abbreviation for hustru or wife
  • pig. – abbreviation for piga or maid
  • dtr – Often you will see “dtr” as an abbreviation for dotter or daughter in the name. The full names in this case are Maria Larsdotter and Cherstin Persdotter.
  • ibidem – Latin term meaning the same

The entry number 10 states that this was the 10th birth entry for the year.

You can see that one really doesn’t need to know Swedish to read the record. The record is primarily a table of names, dates and places. Yes, there are a few Swedish words but these words are used repeatedly in the church books so one just needs to become familiar with a few Swedish words to become comfortable reading the records.

ort name indexForssa (D) AI:2 (1757-1766) Image 5 (AID: v55102.b5, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Click here for more birth record reading examples.

ArkivDigital

Beginning Swedish Research Tutorials

churchbooksummaryAlgutsrum (H) CI:3 (1779-1854) Image 104 / page 203 (AID: v37085.b104.s203, NAD: SE/VALA/00005) Link.

Are you new to Swedish research and don’t know how to get started? Want to know more on how to research in the Swedish church books? Today, we would like to provide a summary of our English tutorials and blogs providing tips on how to get started and researching in the church books.

Tips for beginning Swedish research
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/research-tips (Link)

Introduction to Swedish Church Books
https://www.arkivdigital.net/swedish-genealogy/swedish-church-books (Link)

Birth Record Examples
1700’s birth record example (Link)
1800’s birth record example (Link)
1814 Christmas birth reading example (Link)

Marriage Record Examples
1700’s marriage record example (Link)
1800’s marriage record example (Link)
Marriage record example from Jönköping (Link)

Death Record Examples
1700’s death record example (Link)
1800’s death record example (Link)
Death record example from Söderfors parish (Link)

Household Record Example
https://www.arkivdigital.net/swedish-genealogy/late-1800s-household-examination-record-example (Link)

Moving In/Out Records Example
https://www.arkivdigital.net/swedish-genealogy/moving-records (Link)

Case Study – Searching for Birth Record
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/birth-record-search-and-reading-example/ (Link)

Case Study – Searching for Household Record
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/search-for-household-record-and-reading-example/ (Link)

ArkivDigital

Two blacksmiths in same parish had stillborn babies on same day

Sometimes by chance, unusual events seem to happen around the same time. In an earlier blog, we described two triplet births that happened in the same parish with only a few months between the births.

That a stillborn child would be born to two men with the same occupation on the same day in the same parish is highly unlikely. But this happened in 1798 in Burlöv parish in Skåne.

smedenstillbirthsBurlöv CI:4 (1775-1816) Image 91 / page 92 (AID: v106310.b91.s92, NAD: SE/LLA/13050) Link.

Den 26 januari fick smeden Bengt Andersson och hans hustru Kjerstina Nilsdotter tvillingar, varav den ena var dödfödd. Samma dag fick smeden Pär Ahlström och hans hustru Elna Bengtsdotter en dödfödd son.

On the 26th of January, twins were born to the blacksmith Bengt Andersson and Kjerstina Nilsdotter. One of the twins was stillborn. On the same day, a stillborn son was born to blacksmith, Pär Ahlström and his wife, Elna Bengtsdotter.

At this time the number of stillborn children in Sweden was approximately 27 per 1,000 births. Today, it is about 4 per 1,000. During the second half of the 1700’s, there were approximately 70,00 births per year. The number increased during the first decades of the 1800’s so that by the middle of the 1800’s there were as many births yearly as there are today despite that the population was much smaller. According to the official statistics, there were 2,160 stillbirths in 1798 in Sweden.  While stillbirths were not unusual, still the combination of the above circumstances can be described as being a unique event.

This article was written by Örjan Hedenberg for ArkivDigital and originally published in Swedish. Click here to read in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Moving Certificates

karlskrona-moving-recordKarlskrona amiralitetsförsamling HII:1 (1773-1809) Image 80 (AID: v249317.b80, NAD: SE/LLA/13200) Link.

Whenever a person moved from one parish to another, the minister gave a moving out certificate to the person moving to give to the minister at the new parish. Sometimes, it was a brief notation that included the person’s name and what was considered important to know such as information that the person had fulfilled their duty to receive Holy Communion and marital status. Above is an example from Karlskrona in 1785.

However, in many places even in the 1700’s, preprinted forms existed with lines for dates and places of birth, reading knowledge and proof of receiving of Holy Communion. In addition, often there was a line such as “Är till vande” or something similar referring to the person’s character or morals. This line is interesting because the priest often wrote down his opinion about the person. These opinions often mirror the times and the minister’s views about morality.

moving-out-certificateKarlskrona amiralitetsförsamling HII:31 (1855-1855) Image 1190 (AID: v249347.b1190, NAD: SE/LLA/13200) Link.

An example of this in the above example where the Pigan (maid) Anna Maria Hultberg moved from Karlskrona Stadsförsamling to Karlskrona Amiralitetsförsamling in 1855. Her character is mentioned as ”sålunda att hon eger en oäkta son Carl August” or that she has an illegitimate son, Carl August. It also could be interpreted that the minister considered her to be promiscuous.

One can also note that a completely filled out certificate would include birth date, birth place and parents’ names. Not all the moving certificates have been preserved but they can be a very good source for researchers in tracing a person backwards in time.

The original article was written in Swedish by Örjan Hedenberg. Click here for original in Swedish.

ArkivDigital