Photographing of modern church books complete for several counties

varmland 1945

 At the end of January, ArkivDigital began photographing the modern church books up to the time of the law of privacy limits, currently 1945 (See earlier blog entry). We are happy to announce that we have now completed the photographing for Stockholm, Jämtland, and Gotland counties. In early February, the modern church books for Värmland were added to the online archive.

New volumes of modern church books are continually being added. Currently we are focusing on photographing the books in Blekinge, Halland, Kristianstad, Malmöhus, Västmanland, Kopparberg and Kronoberg counties.

Concerning the privacy limits, we wish to clarify that if a book contains years that are protected by the privacy law, we cannot photograph it. For example if a death and burial book covers the years 1895-1950, we are not able to photograph this book since the book contains years that are protected by the privacy law. The moving in and out registers along with the banns and marriage books are an exception to this rule. Generally, these records are not protected by strict confidentiality so we can often photograph these records even if they include information after 1945.

Finally, we would also like to mention a few words about the birth and baptismal books.  In these books it is common that notes may be added to a record, for example a note relating to an adoption, often decades after the event. The 70 year privacy law begins from the date of the last inserted note. This means that we do not currently have the opportunity to photograph some of the birth and baptismal books even though they do not contain any birth records for persons born after 1945.

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Stockholm Folk Register Cards (1926-1939)

Folkregister

If you are researching in Stockholm city during the period of 1926-1939, you will find the Stockholm Folk Register Cards helpful. You will find one set of cards for the recorded deaths in Stockholm and another set of cards showing movement (utflyttade). These records are found in the archive, “Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ)”

You can search for the records in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  • Go to ArkivDigital Online.
  • Open search window.
  • Click on advanced search.
  • Select Stockholms stad.
  • Select Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ).
  • Or you can enter “folkregister” in the search box and search.

These cards are organized alphabetically for the entire city of Stockholm. You do not need to know the parish where the person lived. However, the sorting is by phonetic spelling. For example both Carlsson’s and Karlsson’s are included in the K’s.

The death cards can be used as a type of person register for the death books. On the front side, you will find the deceased person’s death date, birth date and birth place. On the back side of the card you will find the address where the person lived at the time of his death.

The cards showing the movement of persons are also interesting. The example images below show both sides of the card. The front side of the card shows the head of the household, his wife and child with their birth dates and birth parish. The back side of the card shows the date they moved and the parish where they moved to along with the address.

utfllytade1(Front side) Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ) DVa2:1 (1926-1939) Image 490 (AID: v644688.b490, NAD: SE/SSA/6046) Link.

utflyttade2(Back side) Överståthållarämbetet, Skatteverket, Mantalsavdelningen, Folkregisterkort (ÖÄ) DVa2:1 (1926-1939) Image 500 (AID: v644688.b500, NAD: SE/SSA/6046) Link.

Read more about the Stockholm city folk register cards here.

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Swedish congregations in Oslo and Berlin

Berlin ParishSvenska Victoriaförsamlingen i Berlin OI:3 (1926-1941) Image 4510 (AID: v793345.b4510, NAD: AD/BERLIN/0001) Link.

We have previously posted blogs about the Swedish congregations in Copenhagen and Paris: Svenska Gustafskrykan in Copenhagen and Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen in ParisWe also have records for Swedish congregations in other countries, namely Svenska Victoriaförsamlingen in Berlin, Germany, along with Svenska Margaretaförsamlingen in Oslo, Norway.

Both congregations were established in the beginning of the 1900’s. The birth books for the Oslo congregation begin in 1911 and the marriage and death books begin in 1912. In Berlin, the birth books begin in 1902 and the marriage and death books begin in 1903. For Berlin, there are also congregation books along with moving in and out registers which are missing for Oslo.

In addition to the common record types, we have photographed other types of documents for both the Berlin and Oslo congregations. An example of one is the Svenska Victoriaförsamlingen in Berlin OI: 3 volume which contains documents about church taxes from 1926 to 1941. Among the documents included are letters from church members who believe they do not have to pay a tax. The image above shows a letter from a woman who married a German man and thereby became a German citizen. Since she was required to pay a German church tax, she wrote that she no longer wanted to pay taxes to Victoriaförsamlingen.

Read the blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Modern church books from Värmland are now available

varmland 1945Eda C:15 (1930-1945) Image 1040 / page 96 (AID: v169605.b1040.s96, NAD: SE/VA/13091) Link.

In our blog posting on January 22 (read previous blog), we announced  the good news  that the Swedish National Archives has changed a previous decision which prohibited ArkivDigital from photographing some church books after 1935. Now we have the opportunity to photograph the modern church books up to the time of the law of privacy limits (currently 1945).

As soon as we received this wonderful news, we quickly began photographing the newer church books including congregation records, moving in/out registers, birth, marriage and death books. We are happy to announce that we have added all the church books up to the law of privacy limitations for Värmland county. In addition, we have added newer church records in other counties.

We will post in the blog when additional counties are complete. For more information about the contents in our digital library, click here.

Read blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Good News: Soon more modern church books!

Pressrelease-moderna-kyrkböcker-jan-2016

ArkivDigital will soon begin to photograph the modern church books up to the time of the law of privacy which prohibits some church books younger than 70 years from being published online (currently 1945). This has become possible thanks to a change in a previous decision made by the Swedish National Archives which prohibited ArkivDigital from photographing some church books after 1935.

“We are extremely pleased with this decision,” said Mikael Karlsson, Managing Director of ArkivDigital. “We will immediately redirect our photographing resources, so that we can make the modern church books available to our customers as soon as possible.”

We will first focus on photographing the congregation books, moving in and out registers along with the birth, marriage and death books primarily from the 1930’s and 1940’s.

Link to blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Swedish moving out certificate (flyttningsbevis) photographed in Kansas

kansasflyttning
Lindsborg Bethany Lutheran Church, Kansas, USA Vol:13 (0-9999) Image 510 (AID: v812494a.b510) Link.

On September 29, we published a blog stating that we have begun adding the church books from the Swedish American congregations in Kansas, USA (link to the blog) to ArkivDigital’s online library. Since then we have added more records and more will be added in the coming weeks.

Prior to our photographing trip to Kansas, we had expected to find Swedish American congregation documents created within Kansas. But we were surprised to find moving out records (flyttningsbevis) from  parish churches in Sweden preserved in the church archives.

In the image above, we see the moving our certificate for the widow, Anna Åkersten, issued to her when she departed from Hamrånge parish in Gävleborg county on the 21st of August 1879.  If she had moved to another parish in Sweden, she would have taken this certificate to the new parish in Sweden and given it to the minister. In this case, she gave it to the minster in her new home congregation in North America, Bethany Lutheran Church in Lindsborg, Kansas.  Not all Swedish American churches collected these documents but some did and preserved them.

You can find the Kansas church books in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  • Go to search archive
  • Select advanced options
  • Select the county archive
  • Select the archive “Kansas (USA)”

Read the blog entry in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Name Registers

Name RegisterSläktnamnsregister Skaraborg SlReg:2 (0-1800) Image 6 / page 2 (AID: v187522.b6.s2, NAD: SE/GLA/75003) Link.

For those who research in Göteborg och Bohus, Skaraborg, Älvsborg, Värmland or Västernorrland counties, we wish to point out name registers (släktnamnsregister) that are accessible on ArkivDigital. If one is searching for a person who has a non-patronymic name meaning a name that does not end with a “son” or “dotter”, these registers can be very helpful. Examples of groups of people who had a non-patronymic name were the nobility, priests and not least the many soldiers.

Above is an image from the name register volume for household records for Dimbo härad in Skaraborg county.  If you were searching for Christina Aminoff shown in the above image, you would find her in the household book for Varv parish in Skaraborg county on page 38 in volume AI:2. To search for a name and then to be directed to the page number in the household record naturally saves much time.

The name registers cover normally the period from the beginning of the church books until the year 1800. For Västernorrland, however, the register continues until 1830 (for Medelpad and norra Ångermanland) and respectively to 1856 (for södra Ångermanland). The type of church books which registers exist vary from place to place.  There are registers for household records, moving in-out records, birth, marriage and death records but this varies from county to county and district (härad) to district as to what type of registers are available for that area.

You can find these registers in ArkivDigital by typing in “Släktnamnsregister” in the search box and click search or you can select “advanced options” and search for registers in the archive type selection.  These registers are divided into six archives, one for each county with the exception for Älvsborg county which has separate archives for Dalsland and Västgötadelen.

Read the original article in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

Records over Non-Existing Persons

missing persons

At many conferences in North America, the question often comes up, “What are the records for non-existing persons?”  Volumes titled “records over non-existing persons” appear in the volume list for many parish archives on ArkivDigital’s English interface as shown in the above image.

The “records over non-existing persons” volume or “obefintlighetsbok” is a list of the persons within the parish whose whereabouts are unknown or in other words missing. Whenever a person moved out of the parish, they were supposed to advise the parish minister that they were leaving and where they were moving to. The minister gave the individual a moving out certificate showing information about his birth, last residence, character and religious standing and the minister recorded the information in the household examination book and moving out book. If the individual moved to another parish within Sweden, he or she would give the certificate to the new minister and that minister would record it in the moving in book and the household examination record. This is the reason why in most cases it is easy to trace a person whereabouts in the Swedish books.

However, there were many cases where the person left the parish without telling the minister. Before the 1880’s the ministers had much freedom as to how they would enter information in the household examination books about persons who disappeared. Some would just cross out the name while others would move the person to a “obefintlighet” page in the household examination book or the “obefintlighetsbok”.

In 1894, there was a requirement that the missing should be listing in a special category, “obefintlighet” or whereabouts not known.  Often you will find persons who emigrated without securing the necessary moving out papers in these lists.

You can read this article as well as other Swedish genealogy tutorials on our website in the section titled, Swedish Genealogy.

ArkivDigital

Household record search and reading example

In a previous blog, we searched for the birth record of Elin Andersdotter who was born on the 13th of July 1841 in Västra Torsås parish in Kronoberg county.  In the birth record, we discovered her parents were Anders Nilsson and Ingrid Magnisdotter and that they resided at a place in the parish named Långasten.

Today, we will search for the family in the household records. Each pastor was required to take a yearly accounting of all members in his parish and test them for their religious understanding. In order to do this accounting, the minister made lists of all the people living in the parish, household by household. These records were kept in large books and each volume covers a series of years.  The number of years vary by parish and time. Many of these books begin in the late 1700’s but they do exist earlier for some parishes. By using the household records and congregation books, one can often trace a person from birth to death or birth to emigration.

search for household record

To search for the household records for 1841:

  • Return to the archive for Västra Torsås as shown in the above image.
  • Search for a household records volume that includes 1841.
  • Highlight the book Västra Torsås AI:6 1840-1847.
  • Double click and open the book.
  • Look for a place name index (ortsregister). This is usually in the front of the book but sometimes is in the back. Not all household records books have an index. In those cases you will need to page through the book to locate the place.

place name indexVästra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 8 (AID: v21256.b8, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

  • Search for the Elin’s residence, Långasten, in the place name index and you see that the records for this place begin on page 396 and 401 as shown in the above image.
  • Go to page 396 and begin your search for the family.

household imageVästra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 409 / page 396 (AID: v21256.b409.s396, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

You will find the family on page 396. In the first column on the top line is the place name, No. 69 Långasten. The first column shows the family member names living in the household during the period the book covers.

The major column headings on this household record are:

  • Födelse  –  Birth
  • Flyttningar – Moving (Moves in and out)
  • Läser  –   Read
  • Nattvardsgång -  Communion
  • Husförhör – Household examination
  • Omständigheter – Special circumstances or special remarks

Under the birth (födelse) column you will see the sub-columns, dag, år and ort which respectively mean day, year and place. In these columns, you will find the birth dates and birth places for each member of the household. In this case you notice that only the birth year is shown for the father while complete birth dates are shown for the rest of the family.

Below is a list of all the household members’ names and birth dates:

Name                                      Birth Date
B. M. Anders Nilssson           1798  (B. is an abbreviation for bonde or famer; M. – husband)
H. Ingjerd Magnisdotter      13 April 1797 (H. is an abbreviation for hustru or wife)
o ä D. Stina Johansdotter     11 March 1820 (Ingjerd’s illegitimate daughter)
o ä S. Magus Olsson               28 April 1845 (Stina’s illegitimate son)
S. Nils Andersson                     7 November 1827 (S. is the abbreviation for son)
D. Ingrid                                  28 January 1830 (D. is the abbreviation for daughter)
D. Catherina                            24 December 1838
D. Elin                                       13 July 1841

Usually, you will find the name of the parish in the birth place column. Sometimes, it will be a village name or sometimes the county name or a country. But in most cases, it is the parish name. In this case there is no entry and that usually but not always means the birth was recorded in the same parish as the household record so in this case, Västra Torsås. We do know that is true for Elin’s birth record. To search for the birth records for other members in the family, we should first look for their birth records in Västra Torsås.

The moving in and moving out columns (flyttningar) are very important columns. The columns indicate if the person has moved into or out of this place during the period the household records book covers or in this case 1840-1847.  The moving in columns include the year (år) and from location (ifrån) and the moving to columns are year (år) and to place (till).

You will notice that there is an entry in the moving to column for Stina Johansdotter and her son Magnus Olsson. It states that they moved to a place that is shown on page 373 in the same book in 1848. Also, you will note their names are crossed out. A cross out indicates a person has moved or died.  In order to find them at their new residence, go to page 373 in the same book. You will find them at the following reference in ArkivDigital:  Västra Torsås AI:6 (1840-1847) Image 386 / page 373 (AID: v21256.b386.s373, NAD: SE/VALA/00453) Link.

There are no entries in the moving in or moving out columns for the other members of the household. Since there are no notations of a move, we can assume that they lived in the same place, No. 69 Långasten, in the previous household records book and in the subsequent one.  We can trace the family both backwards and forward by looking for the place, Långasten, in the place name index in the previous and subsequent household records books and look for the family in the same manner as we did in this book.

The last column, Omständigheter or special circumstances, can offer some additional information about your ancestor. In this case, you will see the following noted for Stina Johansdotter:

Transcription
Lysn. d. 6/5 48  med Torp. Jöns Svensson

Translation
Banns of marriage date 6 of May 1848 for marriage with Torpare (Crofter) Jöns Svensson

Click here for more information about household records plus a record example in the Swedish genealogy section of our website.

ArkivDigital

Swedish Parish Records in Paris now on ArkivDigital

sofia in paris
Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen i Paris AV:1 (0-9999) Image 40 (AID: v793349.b40, NAD: AD/PARIS/0001)

Sweden’s oldest international parish, Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen, is in Paris, France. The Swedish church presence in Paris dates back to 1626, when Professor Jonas Hambraeus at the Paris Academy began to gather Swedish and German Lutherans for worship services. The parish services were both in Swedish and German. On Sunday, worship services were usually held first in Swedish and then in German. Knowing this, it is easy to understand why the oldest books in the church’s archive are written in German as the above image out of one of the books from the 1600’s shows.

The Swedish parish in Paris existed from the end of the 1600’s to 1806 as an embassy church. The parish did not have a permanent location for services and moved around between the diplomatic envoys’ different residences. At the time of Napoleon Bonaparte’s crowning in 1806, the parish minister received an order to leave the country. For the years up to 1806, there are three volumes available on ArkivDigital: 2 parish registers (församlingsregister) volumes AV: 1-2 (written in German) and a marriage book for the years, 1764-1806. A large portion of the marriage book is written in French.

In the autumn of 1858, the embassy preacher Thor Frithiof Grafström was sent to Paris. At the time, there was the Union between Sweden and Norway and Grafström’s commission was to establish a Swedish-Norwegian parish. The volume, Svenska Sofiaförsamlingen i Paris AI:1, includes various types of documents from the Swedish-Norwegian parish in Paris during the years 1859-1863.

During the period 1863-1877, there was no Swedish priest in Paris. Since 1877 when Emil Flygare became the minister in Paris, the Swedish church presence in Paris has continued without interruption. The parish received its current name in 1878 when the first church, Sofiakapellet, was consecrated and named after the Swedish queen, Sofia of Nassau. The current Swedish parish church, Sofiakyrkan, was consecrated in 1913.

Most of the volumes for the Sofia parish in Paris are after 1877. These volumes include household examination/congregation books, migration records, birth, marriage and death books along with many other types of documents.

Read the original article published in Swedish.

ArkivDigital