Using the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 to discover where Hilda moved to!

Within the household and congregation records, there is an entry showing where a person moved to if the person moved during the period the household/congregation books cover.  The information that is normally shown is the place and a date or sometimes there is a reference to another page number and date within the same household book.  However, many times the minister will note an abbreviation that is not easily understood and one must take some time to discover where the person has moved. In the image below, it states that Hilda Joseph. (Josephina). Hjorth born on the 20th of May 1833 moved from Önumstorp in Önum parish in Skaraborg county to V. 41 in 1871.  What does “V. 41” mean?

onum hflÖnum (R) AI:9 (1867-1881) Image 148 / page 142 (AID: v12796.b148.s142, NAD: SE/GLA/13674) Link.

There are two methods for discovering what “V. 41″ means: using traditional methods of deciphering the meaning or using the Population of Sweden 1860-1930.

Now, while the reference to a page number is not usually the letter V, one might go to page 41 in the same household book to see if she is listed there and if one goes there, Hilda will not be found.

The next step is to determine if the parish, Önum, belongs to a pastorat. See previous blog for more information about a pastorat. 

You can check if Önum belongs to a pastorat by accessing ArkivDigital, selecting new archive search, entering Önum in the search box and search. Open the archive for Önum parish and click on the archive info tab. There you will get information about what pastorat Önum belongs to. See the image below.

onum archive info

You will note the following information in the archive info box: Före den 1 maj 1920 var Önum annexförsamling i Skarstads, Hällums, Vara och Önums pastorat or before the 1st of May 1920, Önum was an annex parish in the Skarstads, Hällums, Vara and Önums pastorat.

This information gives us a clue that “V”. might mean Vara and 41 the page number in the Vara household book that includes the year 1871. Our next step is go to archive search and, enter Vara in the search box and click search.

vara search

Search for a household book that includes the year 1871 which is AI:7 that covers the years 1867-1878 and open the volume and go to page 41.

varahfl41Vara (R) AI:7 (1867-1878) Image 46 / page 41 (AID: v12751.b46.s41, NAD: SE/GLA/13611) Link.

In the above image you will see a reference that Hilda has moved in from “Ö 142” or Önum parish on page 142. In this case, the minister is abbreviating Önum. This minister often abbreviates the parish names of parishes within the pastorat by showing only the first letter of the parish name.

Search using the Population of Sweden 1860 to 1930 Search Index
The Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index makes Swedish research so much easier. For this same case, we can go to New index search, select the Population of Sweden 1860 to 1930 index, enter Hilda and her birth date 18330520 in the search box, and click search. We receive 7 matches that we can analyze. (There are other ways of searching such as using the advanced search method or using various search criteria,) We see one household record is in Vara. We can quickly link on the match and then link on the image to verify the information. Thus, we quickly know that “V. 41” means Vara page 41. Of course, we have to verify that all the information agrees and this is right Hilda. This one is correct.

1860 Vara search

This is an example how Swedish research is becoming much easier and quicker using the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index.

ArkivDigital

Additions to the Population of Sweden 1860-1930

The Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index in ArkivDigital is Sweden’s largest name register. The register, a name searchable index of the household and congregation records from 1860 to 1930, has been expanded by almost 3.7 million new entries. The total number of register entries now totals to just over 88 million.

more 1860 to 1930 indexSearching in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 Index

The register entries have been added to close some gaps that have been found in the index. If you previously searched for a person using this index, but could not find the person, you may want to try again.

Click here for more information about the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index.

Click here for more information about the advanced searching features.

To access the Population of Sweden 1860–1930 index, one needs an All-in-one subscription.

Read the original blog in Swedish.


ArkivDigital

United States Naturalization Records in Nebraska Collection

We now have 118 archives in our Nebraska collection. Most of these archives are Swedish American congregation records but not all are church records. One interesting collection in the Nebraska archives consists of declarations of intention, petitions for naturalization and final papers for United States citizenship. These records are from the District Court of Polk County in Osceola, Nebraska.

The process for United States citizenship was generally a two-step process. After a person lived in the U.S. for two years, the person could file a “declaration of intention” to become a citizen. After three additional years, the person could file a petition for naturalization. After the petition was granted, the person was given a certification of naturalization and became a citizen. Click here for more information about the naturalization process.

These applications for citizenship primarily the “declaration of intention” are often used to help a person identify where their ancestor came from in Sweden. Below is the declaration of intention for Axel Theodore Norstrom.

declaration of intentionDistrict Court of Polk County, Osceola, Nebraska, USA (NE) Vol:1 (1907-1922) Image 47 / page 33 (AID: v896407.b47.s33, NAD) Link.

The “declaration of intention” includes such information as physical description, age, occupation, birth date and birth place, emigration place, often name of ship along with date of arrival and arrival port.

In the above record dated 18th of January 1909 we see that Axel was born in Skinnskatteberg parish in Sweden on the 10th of September 1863. He is now living in Stromsberg, Nebraska. The record states that he emigrated from Göteborg, Sweden on the ship, Arabic, and arrived in the port of Boston, Massachusetts on the 14th of October 1905. His last residence in Sweden is Malma. (Note – in the declaration of intention it looks like Malmo but as we do more research, we discover that the last residence in Sweden is in the parish of Malma in Västmanland county).

With the above information, we can jump into the Swedish church book records and verify the information on the declaration of intention. We can search for the birth books for Skinnskatteberg parish and look for his birth record in 1863. Below is his birth record.

norstroms birth recordSkinnskatteberg (U) C:11 (1862-1878) Image 26 (AID: v74059.b26, NAD: SE/ULA/11336) Link.

We can follow him in the household books from the time of his birth until his emigration. Below is the household record showing him emigrating from Malma parish in Västmanland county to America in 1905. You notice that his Swedish name is “Axel Teodor Norström” and the American version is ” Axel Theodore Norstrom”.

norstrom hfl emigration recordMalma (U) AII:2 (1902-1914) Image 150 / page 3 (AID: v263759.b150.s3, NAD: SE/ULA/11056) Link.

You can find the “declarations of intentions” in the District Court Polk County, Nebraska Archives in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  • Select New Archive search.
  • Select county, Nebraska.
  • Select District Court of Polk County, Osceola, Nebraska USA archive.
  • Select the book with the years that you are interested in.
  • Each book contains a name register in the front of the book.

ArkivDigital

Name Searchable Indexes in ArkivDigital

Swedish genealogy is becoming easier as new name searchable indexes become available in ArkivDigital. Most of these indexes are found only in the All-in-One subscription. The Population of Sweden 1950 index is found in both the base and All-in-One subscriptions. Today, we will review the name searchable indexes that exist in ArkivDigital as well point out the blogs that provide additional information.

You can find the name searchable indexes in ArkivDigital by doing the following:

  • Access  ArkivDigital
  • Select New Index Search
  • Select index source

indexsearchallinoneIndexes available in the All-in-One subscription

Population of Sweden 1950 – Name Searchable of persons living in Sweden in 1950
Available both in base and All-in-One subscriptions
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/name-register-searches-in-arkivdigitals-web-version/
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/advanced-searching/

Population of Sweden 1960 – Name Searchable index of persons living in Sweden in 1960
Only available in All-in-One Subscription
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/advanced-searching/

Population of Sweden 1860 to 1930 – Name index of household/congregation records between 1860 and 1930
Only available in All-in-One Subscription

http://blog.arkivdigital.net/population-of-sweden-1880-1920-grows-and-now-becomes-1860-1920/
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/ten-years-added-to-arkivdigitals-largest-name-register/
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/advanced-searching/

Swedes in US 1940 – All persons in 1940 United States Census who mentioned their birth place was Sweden
Only available in All-in-One Subscription
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/new-register-swedes-in-us-1940/

Inventory of estate – Searchable name index for estate inventories
Only available in All-in-One Subscription
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/digital-searchable-estate-inventory-register-now-in-arkivdigital/

Portrait collection – Personal photographs from three Stockholm photography studios
Only available in All-in-One Subscription
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/a-quarter-of-a-million-portrait-images/

Birth index – Index of births between 1666 and 1894 for Western Södermanland
Marriage index - Index of marriages between 1666 and 1894 for Western Södermanland
Death index - Index of deaths between 1666 and 1894 for Western Södermanland
Only available in All-in-One Subscription
http://blog.arkivdigital.net/registers-for-birth-death-and-marriage-records-1666-1894-for-vastra-sodermanland/

ArkivDigital

Ten years added to ArkivDigital’s largest name register!

Last fall, ArkivDigital’s largest name register became even larger. The Population of Sweden index grew by twenty years from 1880-1920 to 1860 to 1920. Now another decade has been added, so the register spans seventy years, from 1860 to 1930.

The Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is Sweden’s largest name register and includes now about 85 million register posts collected from 30,553 volumes. The register includes all persons who are named in Sweden’s household and congregation books created during those years. This means that a person who moved often will be found several times in the indexes, which explains why the register is many times greater that what Sweden’s population was at the time.

The register is not only the largest one that exists in Sweden, it is probably the easiest to use. All search results contain a direct link to the source. You click on the link and find immediately your relative in the original volume. Very smooth and easy!

1860-1920- Hulda ElisabetImage: Searching in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930

The register Population of Sweden 1860-1930 is included in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription. In ArkivDigital’s web version, you click “New index search” and select “Population of Sweden 1860-1930” under “Index source”. Then you can begin to search by entering the desired name in the search box under “Search index”.

If the name of the person is unusual, it is often enough just to enter the first and last name, but for more common names, for example for the name, Andersson, the birth date or the birthplace should be entered.

 

One should start with a broad search by entering as little as possible. If the search results are too many, add additional information until the search results become manageable. Then click on the desired entry and all the details will be displayed. Under the heading “Links” is a direct link to the original record in the original volume.

The household records (from the 1900’s called congregation books in English) were the most important set of public records, a generally geographically organized general register of residents in the parish where information from other church books (birth, marriage and death books, etc.) were noted along with additional information such as movements within or out of the parish.

 

These records were created for most of Sweden except for a few large parishes within Stockholm city. Instead during the years 1878-1926, a new municipal organization was created called the Roteman’s Institution (rotemansinstitutionen). Stockholm was divided into a number of districts called rotar.  In each district or rote, there was a city employee (roteman) responsible for recording the population statistics. Therefore, many people living in Stockholm are missing in the Population of Sweden 1860-1930 index. They can be found in the Rotemansarkivet 1878-1926 which is found on the Stockholm City Archives free website.

With the update of the Population in Sweden to 1930, ArkivDigital now has more than 100 million registry entries, easily accessible to anyone with an All-In-one subscription, and most of them with a link directly to the source.

 

Read original blog in Swedish.

ArkivDigital

 

Stockholm City Church Book Registers

Researching in the larger cities can often be both difficult and time consuming. For those who research in Stockholm city, there is now a welcome addition in ArkivDigital, name registers for many of the Stockholm city church books.

During the fall, ArkivDigital had added church registers for the parishes in Stockholm city. We have published registers for birth, marriage, death books as well as household and moving in/out books. The registers are found in the archives for the respective parishes (in the form of images and currently the registers are not searchable by name). The types of registers and years covered vary by parish.

The registers that we have photographed are typewritten and were created by the Stockholm city archives. In addition to these registers, you will find in many of the Stockholm city parishes older, handwritten name registers that were created by the respective parish.

Stockholm city registerA page out the Klara parish death book register for the years 1748-1860. The register is organized alphabetically and gives a reference to the volume and page number where you will find the complete record. Link.

The information given in the above death register includes the deceased’s name, occupation or title, death date, burial date, church book volume and page number.

In the example for Mathilda Erica Lindberg (enclosed in a red box), the following information is shown:

  • Name – Mathilda Erica
  • Title – Maid (piga)
  • Death Date – 13 July 1848
  • Burial Date – 16 July
  • Church book volume – FIa:9
  • Page number – 15

Thus, one just needs to return to the Klara parish archive and search for the volume FIa:9, open the book and go to page 15. There you will find the complete death record as shown in the image below.

stockholm death 2Klara (AB, A) FIa:9 (1848-1860) Image 12 / page 16 (AID: v87412.b12.s16, NAD: SE/SSA/0010) Link.

Read the original blog in Swedish by clicking here.

ArkivDigital

Population of Sweden 1880-1920 grows and now becomes 1860-1920

ArkivDigital’s largest and most popular searchable name index, Population of Sweden 1880-1920, is growing. The name index register has been expanded to include 20 additional years and now includes the years from 1860 to 1920.

The name register was already Sweden’s largest personal name register with 47 million entries. Mikael Karlsson, ArkivDigital’s managing director announced, “Now an additional 26 million posts have been added in partnership with MyHeritage. This makes the register more usable for family history researchers. Also, persons who disappeared in the 1860’s and 1870’s now can be easily tracked.”

The index, Population of Sweden 1860-1920, is a name searchable index of all the household books covering these years. This means that a person who has moved several times in his life, can be found posted in many entries, which means that the index is much larger than what the population of Sweden was at that time.

The index is not only the largest one that exists in Sweden; it is also the most user friendly and easiest to use. There is a direct link to the original source from the search result page. You click on the link and immediately you see your ancestor in the actual volume. It can’t get much easier!

1860 search

The index, Population of Sweden 1860-1920, is available in ArkivDigital’s All-in-one subscription. In ArkivDigital’s web version, you click on “New index search” and then select Population of Sweden1860-1920 under “Index search”. Then you enter in the desired name in the search box below “Search index”. There are also advanced search possibilities.

If the name is unusual, it is often sufficient to only enter the first and last name but for more common names one should also enter additional information such as birth date and birth place. At first, one should enter minimum search information. If the search results are too many, then add additional search information until the search result list becomes manageable. Then click on the desired entry and all the details will be displayed. Under the heading “Links”, you will find a direct link to the actual record in the household book.

During the 19th century, the household books were the most important source for recording population information. The household books were organized geographically compiling data for each household in the congregation. Along with the other church books: birth, marriage, death moving in/out books, one gains a deep understanding of one’s ancestor. The household books were created for all parts of Sweden except for a number of the large congregations within Stockholm city. In Stockholm, another method, the roteman system, was used to record the population. Thus, many people who lived in Stockholm are missing in the Population of Sweden 1860-1920 index. One can search for people living in Stockholm in the Rotemansarkivet 1878-1926 which is available on the Stockholm City Archives website.

Read the announcement in Swedish by clicking here.

ArkivDigital

Place Names in the Church Books

Place names in the church books can be names of farms, villages, parishes, counties, countries, abbreviations or even Latin terms.

At a recent conference in North America, the following question was asked: What are the birth places for Fredrik Leopold Hartung and members of his family as shown in the household record in Ystads Sankta Maria parish in Malmöhus county for the years 1882-1887?  Below is the record in question which is an example of a record with various types of place names.

hartungYstads Sankta Maria (M) AI:49 (1882-1887) Image 205 / page 1084 (AID: v111988.b205.s1084, NAD: SE/LLA/13489) Link.

Line 1 – Skomakeriarb. (Shoemaker worker) Fredrik Leopold Hartung’s birth place is Tyskland or Germany. In this case, the birth place is a name of a country. Tyskland is Swedish for Germany.

Line 2 – Hu (an abbreviation for hustru or wife) Charlotta Josefina Klein’s birth place is shown as YSM. This is an abbreviation of the parish, Ystads Sankta Maria. You will find her birth record at the following reference in ArkivDigital: Ystads Sankta Maria (M) C:11 (1827-1845) Image 42 / page 38 (AID: v112010.b42.s38, NAD: SE/LLA/13489).

Note – Her birth date is actually the 20th of April 1834 versus  April 4,1834 as shown in the household record. That will be another blog in the future to show how the correct birth record was found.

Line 3 – Son Carl Fredrik’s, porslinsmål. or abbreviation for porslinsmålare or porcelain painter, birth place is noted as ibm. Ibm is a Latin abbreviation for ibidem or in the same place. In this case, he was born in the same place that was noted above for his mother or Ystads Sankta Maria parish. You will find his birth record in ArkivDigital at the following reference:  Ystads Sankta Maria (M) C:17 (1863-1872) Image 187 / page 184 (AID: v112016.b187.s184, NAD: SE/LLA/13489)

Line 4 – Foster daughter, Charlotta Pettersson and her birth place is noted as YSP or Ystads Sankt Petri. Her birth record can be found in ArkivDigital at the following reference: Ystads Sankt Petri (M) C:8 (1877-1884) Image 30 / page 28 (AID: v111936.b30.s28, NAD: SE/LLA/13490).

In the above household record, we discovered place names in the following formats:

  • Name of a country
  • An abbreviation of a parish name
  • Latin term

ArkivDigital

Church Book Tutorials

At conferences, we receive many questions from our English-speaking customers on where to find examples for reading the church books. Today, we would like to point out that we have some tutorials on our website. In addition, we want to point out a wonderful website that includes some instructional videos on reading birth records from the late 1800’s back to the early 1700’s using ArkivDigital images.

On our English website, you will find a section titled, Swedish Genealogy. In this section, you will find record examples with transcriptions and translations for birth, marriage, death, household examination and moving records and much more. Below are links to these tutorials.

birth tutorial

Also, we would like to point out a wonderful website (swedishgenealogyguide.com) which is free that includes some wonderful instructional videos including among others “Reading Gothic Handwriting for Swedish Genealogy” and several videos showing examples of reading birth records.

Click here to link to the learning center which lists the instructional videos.

ArkivDigital

Birth Record Reading Example

frossa birth recordForssa (D) C:1 (1682-1798) Image 59 / page 95 (AID: v55123.b59.s95, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Today, we will present a lesson in reading a birth record in the 1700’s. The above record is a birth record from 1762 in Forssa parish in Södermanland county. For many experienced researchers, this may appear to be clear and easy to read but for many new researchers this record may seem intimidating.

When looking at the birth records and the same can be said for marriage and death records one needs to become familiar with the minister’s format style for the record. In this case the minister has chosen the following format:

  1. Birth month
  2. Birth day
  3. Baptismal day
  4. Names of parents
  5. Name of the place of residence in the parish (e.g. farm, village, estate)
  6. Child’s Name
  7. Names of baptismal witnesses
  8. Entry number

In this case the child was born on the 12th of July 1762 and baptized on the 18th of July 1762. We know the year is 1762 because that is noted on the top of the page.

The minister has written the names of the parents: Per Andersson, h. Carin Persdotter. The abbreviation “h” is short for hustru or wife.

The place in the parish where the family lives is Stavsjöstugan. If you have difficulty in transcribing the place of residence, check to see if there is household book for that period and look in the place name index for a place that looks similar.

You will need the place name in the birth book to find the family in the household book. Below is the place name index for the corresponding household book You can see in the index at the bottom of the page that the household records for Stavsjöstugan begin on page 61. You will go to page 61 and then begin to look for the family.

The child’s name is Carin.

The names of the baptismal witnesses as written: Per Bengtsson i Spånga, dr. Carl Ericsson i Stavsjöstugan, hust. Maria Lars dtr i Spånga, pig. Cherstin Pers dtr ibidem.

The following abbreviations were used in recording the names of the witnesses:

  • i – in, at
  • dräng - farmhand
  • hust. –  abbreviation for hustru or wife
  • pig. – abbreviation for piga or maid
  • dtr – Often you will see “dtr” as an abbreviation for dotter or daughter in the name. The full names in this case are Maria Larsdotter and Cherstin Persdotter.
  • ibidem – Latin term meaning the same

The entry number 10 states that this was the 10th birth entry for the year.

You can see that one really doesn’t need to know Swedish to read the record. The record is primarily a table of names, dates and places. Yes, there are a few Swedish words but these words are used repeatedly in the church books so one just needs to become familiar with a few Swedish words to become comfortable reading the records.

ort name indexForssa (D) AI:2 (1757-1766) Image 5 (AID: v55102.b5, NAD: SE/ULA/10279) (Link)

Click here for more birth record reading examples.

ArkivDigital